Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Decision quality and satisfaction: the effects of online information sources and self-efficacy

Decision quality and satisfaction: the effects of online information sources and self-efficacy PurposeDigital libraries and social media are two sources of online information with different characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to integrate self-efficacy into the analysis of the relationship between information sources and decision making, and to explore the effect of self-efficacy on decision making, as well as the interacting effect of self-efficacy and information sources on decision making.Design/methodology/approachSurvey data were collected and the partial least squares structural equation modeling was employed to verify the research model.FindingsThe effect of digital library usage for acquiring information on perceived decision quality (PDQ) is larger than that of social media usage for acquiring information on PDQ. Self-efficacy in acquiring information (SEAI) stands out as the key determinant for PDQ. The effect of social media usage for acquiring information on PDQ is positively moderated by SEAI.Practical implicationsDecision making is a fundamental activity for individuals, but human decision making is often subject to biases. The findings of this study provide useful insights into decision quality improvement, highlighting the importance of SEAI in the face of information overload.Originality/valueThis study integrates self-efficacy into the analysis of the relationship between information sources and decision making, presenting a new perspective for decision-making research and practice alike. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Internet Research Emerald Publishing

Decision quality and satisfaction: the effects of online information sources and self-efficacy

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/decision-quality-and-satisfaction-the-effects-of-online-information-zstnOzpJRy
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1066-2243
DOI
10.1108/IntR-04-2016-0089
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeDigital libraries and social media are two sources of online information with different characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to integrate self-efficacy into the analysis of the relationship between information sources and decision making, and to explore the effect of self-efficacy on decision making, as well as the interacting effect of self-efficacy and information sources on decision making.Design/methodology/approachSurvey data were collected and the partial least squares structural equation modeling was employed to verify the research model.FindingsThe effect of digital library usage for acquiring information on perceived decision quality (PDQ) is larger than that of social media usage for acquiring information on PDQ. Self-efficacy in acquiring information (SEAI) stands out as the key determinant for PDQ. The effect of social media usage for acquiring information on PDQ is positively moderated by SEAI.Practical implicationsDecision making is a fundamental activity for individuals, but human decision making is often subject to biases. The findings of this study provide useful insights into decision quality improvement, highlighting the importance of SEAI in the face of information overload.Originality/valueThis study integrates self-efficacy into the analysis of the relationship between information sources and decision making, presenting a new perspective for decision-making research and practice alike.

Journal

Internet ResearchEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 7, 2017

There are no references for this article.