Death and dying in residential care: a matter of concern

Death and dying in residential care: a matter of concern Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to trace the history of official policy on the regulation of care homes in respect of end of life care and to contrast this with the results of research on this important theme, not least in terms of what is required to support care home staff in relation to dying residents and their relatives. A central concern is to argue for the open recognition that care homes now cater primarily for frail people towards the end of their lives. Good end of life care and a good death could become a positive “selling point”. The author concludes that the system of regulation has broadly failed to address a good death or good end of life care in a residential home. Death talk should no longer need to be avoided in care homes. The research suggests that appropriate support for care home staff in relation to dying residents needs careful identification and investment. A cultural shift is required. Design/methodology/approach – Following a review of policy documents on regulation and standards of care in residential homes and a subsequent review of the research literature on death and dying in care homes, the paper illuminates the contrast between the ambitious aims in policy documents with very varied practice in everyday care of frail residents. Findings – The recent systems of regulation have broadly failed to address a good death or good end of life care in residential homes. Open acknowledgement of death and dying should not be avoided in care homes. Appropriate support for care home staff in relation to dying residents needs careful identification and investment. Originality/value – The focus of this paper is to contrast official policy with everyday practice. Whilst policy documents suggest recognition of the importance of dignity and respect from dying residents, the research literature indicates great variation in the practice of everyday care. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Emerald Publishing

Death and dying in residential care: a matter of concern

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, Volume 14 (3): 13 – Sep 6, 2013

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1471-7794
DOI
10.1108/QAOA-01-2013-0001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to trace the history of official policy on the regulation of care homes in respect of end of life care and to contrast this with the results of research on this important theme, not least in terms of what is required to support care home staff in relation to dying residents and their relatives. A central concern is to argue for the open recognition that care homes now cater primarily for frail people towards the end of their lives. Good end of life care and a good death could become a positive “selling point”. The author concludes that the system of regulation has broadly failed to address a good death or good end of life care in a residential home. Death talk should no longer need to be avoided in care homes. The research suggests that appropriate support for care home staff in relation to dying residents needs careful identification and investment. A cultural shift is required. Design/methodology/approach – Following a review of policy documents on regulation and standards of care in residential homes and a subsequent review of the research literature on death and dying in care homes, the paper illuminates the contrast between the ambitious aims in policy documents with very varied practice in everyday care of frail residents. Findings – The recent systems of regulation have broadly failed to address a good death or good end of life care in residential homes. Open acknowledgement of death and dying should not be avoided in care homes. Appropriate support for care home staff in relation to dying residents needs careful identification and investment. Originality/value – The focus of this paper is to contrast official policy with everyday practice. Whilst policy documents suggest recognition of the importance of dignity and respect from dying residents, the research literature indicates great variation in the practice of everyday care.

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 6, 2013

Keywords: Death; Dying; End of life care; Residential care

References

  • Dignity in the terminally ill: a developing empirical model
    Chochinov, H.M.; Hack, T.; McClement, S.; Kristjanson, L.; Harlos, M.
  • A survey of end‐of‐life care in care homes: issues of definition and practice
    Froggatt, K.; Payne, S.
  • End‐of‐life care in long‐term care settings for older people: a literature review
    Froggatt, K.; Wilson, D.; Justice, C.; Macadam, M.; Leibovici, K.; Kinch, J.; Thomas, R.; Choi, J.
  • A hindrance or a help? The contribution of inspection to the quality of care in homes for older people
    Furness, S.

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