Data retention: an assessment of a proposed national scheme

Data retention: an assessment of a proposed national scheme PurposeThe information society has developed rapidly since the end of the twentieth century. Many countries (including Australia) have been looking at ways to protect their citizens against the variety of risks associated with the continued evolution of the internet. The Australian Federal Government in 2013 proposed data retention as one possible method of protecting Australian society and aiding law enforcement agencies to investigate and prosecute cyber-crime.Design/methodology/approachThe aim of this paper is to consider the issue of data retention from a stakeholder’s perspective by analysing the public submissions garnered by the Australian Federal Government and identify the key issues and concerns that were raised by these stakeholders. The paper used a qualitative approach to undertake theme analysis.FindingsThe paper shows the concerns and wishes that different stakes holders have regarding data retention within Australia.Originality/valueThis is a unique study into implementation of data retention at a national level, in terms of the paper focussing on Australia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society Emerald Publishing

Data retention: an assessment of a proposed national scheme

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1477-996X
DOI
10.1108/JICES-12-2017-0073
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe information society has developed rapidly since the end of the twentieth century. Many countries (including Australia) have been looking at ways to protect their citizens against the variety of risks associated with the continued evolution of the internet. The Australian Federal Government in 2013 proposed data retention as one possible method of protecting Australian society and aiding law enforcement agencies to investigate and prosecute cyber-crime.Design/methodology/approachThe aim of this paper is to consider the issue of data retention from a stakeholder’s perspective by analysing the public submissions garnered by the Australian Federal Government and identify the key issues and concerns that were raised by these stakeholders. The paper used a qualitative approach to undertake theme analysis.FindingsThe paper shows the concerns and wishes that different stakes holders have regarding data retention within Australia.Originality/valueThis is a unique study into implementation of data retention at a national level, in terms of the paper focussing on Australia.

Journal

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in SocietyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 11, 2019

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