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Danger of Sabotage to Lubrication Systems

Danger of Sabotage to Lubrication Systems VOLUME 2 SEPTEMBER No. 9 195 0 Scientific Dange r of Sabotag LUBRICATION e to Lubrication Systems THE international situation again calls for increased continu e to do so. The oils of twent y to thirt y years productio n from our factories. Whilst still ag o would not be satisfactory lubricants for the producin g as much as possible for export, as many moder n aero engine. factories as possible must be turned over once again Th e first of thre e articles on this subject appears in t o a wartime rate of production in pursuance of our thi s issue, and the subject is important in present defence programme . It is agai n going t o b e especially times . The basic principles of the aero engine importan t to give constant attention to preventive lubricatin g system are the same as those for any maintenance . Anything tha t can be done t o prevent interna l combustion engine, bu t cannot be dismissed a breakdown to any vital mechanism, or to delay so lightly. Failure of the system, when airborne, such a breakdown until repairs can be effected, will ca n spell disaster to both plane and crew. Failure of materiall y assist this production drive. th e hydraulic system might interfere with gun oper­ ation , or endanger landing. Correct lubrication is an important aid to pre­ ventiv e maintenance and particularly the correct applicatio n of lubricants. Maintenance engineers Sever e Operating Conditions. should ensure tha t no machin e is going t o sto p because Th e passages that have to be traversed by the of lack of lubricant. It is more than possible that lubricatin g oil in an aero engine are many times th e extra output that is required might not be ob­ greate r than in any other i.e. engine and the con­ taine d because of th e failure of one important bearing. ditions tha t it meets are the extremes of those met wit h elsewhere. For example, the engine oil is invariabl y used for the operation of the propeller Lubricatio n Sabotage. pitc h control mechanism. This oil must contend Th e danger of sabotage is ever present and recently wit h high engine temperatures for cylinder lubric­ ha s caused more serious alar m in some quarters. The ation , and with very low temperatures for propeller need for entrusting the oil stores and oil distribution pitc h control when travelling at high altitudes. t o one ma n in all large works where important plant Pressure s to which the oil may be submitted are is operating is one safeguard. It is difficult to also difficult. They vary from a partial vacuum at completel y eliminate all risk of damage by contamin­ th e scavenge pump to more than 3,000 lb/sq. in. in ate d lubricating oil, but there are too many large some bearings. Pressures between the teeth of gear organization s who make it too easy for saboteurs to wheels in reduction trains are higher tha n experienced carr y out their evil schemes, and few easier methods in most other cases. Another important factor is presen t themselves than tampering with lubrication cleanliness, particularly in connection with super­ systems . charger lubrication, filtration must be very good. Powe r houses usually have trusted servants as Aero engines are usually stripped down frequently, engine attendants , but it would not bo here tha t the bu t any development that allows increased flying saboteu r might act. He would be more likely t o raid tim e between dismantling provides valuable progress, th e oil stores where he may have the chance of an d improved lubricating oils can play their part in effecting damage to all the principal machines in the this . work s at one blow. Th e Motor Shows. Aer o Engine Lubrication. Several lubricating oil companies, and many Advancemen t in aeroplane design during recent equipmen t manufacturers will have stands at the year s has been very great, and is continuing. The commercial and international motor shows, this moder n tendency is t o increase flying speeds, reduce mont h and next. It will be possible to note the engine weight, increase engine output, increase advancemen t in design of equipment for providing manoeuvrability , and increase load carrying capacity. applicatio n of oils and greases to motor vehicles. These objects are being achieved successfully, but in Much of this apparatus is designed for vehicle oper­ ever y case more work is thrown upon the engine ator s and garages, but the private motorist, who is lubricatin g oil. Up to now, developments in aero intereste d in correct lubrication, will find much to engin e lubricants have been able to keep pace with interes t him on these stands after he has seen the engine design, and it is expected that they will cars tha t he would like, but cannot have. Scientific LUBRICATION 9 September, 1950 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Emerald Publishing

Danger of Sabotage to Lubrication Systems

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology , Volume 2 (9): 1 – Sep 1, 1950

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0036-8792
DOI
10.1108/eb052073
Publisher site
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Abstract

VOLUME 2 SEPTEMBER No. 9 195 0 Scientific Dange r of Sabotag LUBRICATION e to Lubrication Systems THE international situation again calls for increased continu e to do so. The oils of twent y to thirt y years productio n from our factories. Whilst still ag o would not be satisfactory lubricants for the producin g as much as possible for export, as many moder n aero engine. factories as possible must be turned over once again Th e first of thre e articles on this subject appears in t o a wartime rate of production in pursuance of our thi s issue, and the subject is important in present defence programme . It is agai n going t o b e especially times . The basic principles of the aero engine importan t to give constant attention to preventive lubricatin g system are the same as those for any maintenance . Anything tha t can be done t o prevent interna l combustion engine, bu t cannot be dismissed a breakdown to any vital mechanism, or to delay so lightly. Failure of the system, when airborne, such a breakdown until repairs can be effected, will ca n spell disaster to both plane and crew. Failure of materiall y assist this production drive. th e hydraulic system might interfere with gun oper­ ation , or endanger landing. Correct lubrication is an important aid to pre­ ventiv e maintenance and particularly the correct applicatio n of lubricants. Maintenance engineers Sever e Operating Conditions. should ensure tha t no machin e is going t o sto p because Th e passages that have to be traversed by the of lack of lubricant. It is more than possible that lubricatin g oil in an aero engine are many times th e extra output that is required might not be ob­ greate r than in any other i.e. engine and the con­ taine d because of th e failure of one important bearing. ditions tha t it meets are the extremes of those met wit h elsewhere. For example, the engine oil is invariabl y used for the operation of the propeller Lubricatio n Sabotage. pitc h control mechanism. This oil must contend Th e danger of sabotage is ever present and recently wit h high engine temperatures for cylinder lubric­ ha s caused more serious alar m in some quarters. The ation , and with very low temperatures for propeller need for entrusting the oil stores and oil distribution pitc h control when travelling at high altitudes. t o one ma n in all large works where important plant Pressure s to which the oil may be submitted are is operating is one safeguard. It is difficult to also difficult. They vary from a partial vacuum at completel y eliminate all risk of damage by contamin­ th e scavenge pump to more than 3,000 lb/sq. in. in ate d lubricating oil, but there are too many large some bearings. Pressures between the teeth of gear organization s who make it too easy for saboteurs to wheels in reduction trains are higher tha n experienced carr y out their evil schemes, and few easier methods in most other cases. Another important factor is presen t themselves than tampering with lubrication cleanliness, particularly in connection with super­ systems . charger lubrication, filtration must be very good. Powe r houses usually have trusted servants as Aero engines are usually stripped down frequently, engine attendants , but it would not bo here tha t the bu t any development that allows increased flying saboteu r might act. He would be more likely t o raid tim e between dismantling provides valuable progress, th e oil stores where he may have the chance of an d improved lubricating oils can play their part in effecting damage to all the principal machines in the this . work s at one blow. Th e Motor Shows. Aer o Engine Lubrication. Several lubricating oil companies, and many Advancemen t in aeroplane design during recent equipmen t manufacturers will have stands at the year s has been very great, and is continuing. The commercial and international motor shows, this moder n tendency is t o increase flying speeds, reduce mont h and next. It will be possible to note the engine weight, increase engine output, increase advancemen t in design of equipment for providing manoeuvrability , and increase load carrying capacity. applicatio n of oils and greases to motor vehicles. These objects are being achieved successfully, but in Much of this apparatus is designed for vehicle oper­ ever y case more work is thrown upon the engine ator s and garages, but the private motorist, who is lubricatin g oil. Up to now, developments in aero intereste d in correct lubrication, will find much to engin e lubricants have been able to keep pace with interes t him on these stands after he has seen the engine design, and it is expected that they will cars tha t he would like, but cannot have. Scientific LUBRICATION 9 September, 1950

Journal

Industrial Lubrication and TribologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1950

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