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Cutting fluid efficiency in end milling of AISI 304 stainless steel

Cutting fluid efficiency in end milling of AISI 304 stainless steel Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the efficiency of cutting fluids when end milling AISI 304 stainless steels. Design/methodology/approach – Two groups of cutting tests were conducted, one with the application of a coolant (wet machining) and the other – without (dry cutting), using multilayer coated carbide inserts. The findings of tool life and tool wear mechanisms are compared. Findings – Coolant application proves to be efficient at low‐cutting speeds. With increasing the cutting speed, the coolant effect on improving tool life becomes less significant. Built‐up edge and nose wear are the dominant failure mechanisms in dry machining, while in wet machining, the dominant mechanisms are found to be notch wear and cutting edge grooving. Originality/value – This paper provides useful information for manufacturing engineers dealing with end milling of stainless steel components. It helps select beneficial cutting conditions for dry and wet end milling operations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Emerald Publishing

Cutting fluid efficiency in end milling of AISI 304 stainless steel

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0036-8792
DOI
10.1108/00368790810871039
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the efficiency of cutting fluids when end milling AISI 304 stainless steels. Design/methodology/approach – Two groups of cutting tests were conducted, one with the application of a coolant (wet machining) and the other – without (dry cutting), using multilayer coated carbide inserts. The findings of tool life and tool wear mechanisms are compared. Findings – Coolant application proves to be efficient at low‐cutting speeds. With increasing the cutting speed, the coolant effect on improving tool life becomes less significant. Built‐up edge and nose wear are the dominant failure mechanisms in dry machining, while in wet machining, the dominant mechanisms are found to be notch wear and cutting edge grooving. Originality/value – This paper provides useful information for manufacturing engineers dealing with end milling of stainless steel components. It helps select beneficial cutting conditions for dry and wet end milling operations.

Journal

Industrial Lubrication and TribologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 2, 2008

Keywords: Machine tools; Production engineering; Stainless steel; Machineability; Fluids

References