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Customer satisfaction and organisational justice

Customer satisfaction and organisational justice Applies organisational justice theory to facilities management with the aim of increasing customer satisfaction with the service received. Provides an overview of organisational justice theory, and reviews the numerous different forms that this may take. Although there is strong theoretical support for participative decision making, in practice it often leads to conflict and delays. Two‐way communication appears to represent the most effective form. The conclusions are based upon theoretical support as well as semi‐structured interviews and observations in an organisational setting. The conclusions drawn do not have the benefits of more objective quantitative research methods. Contributes to practical understanding of how to maintain customer satisfaction in the facilities management industry and the theoretical reasons why the proposed methods will be effective. Argues that the impact of organisational justice on employee satisfaction can be applied to customer satisfaction with specific reference to facilities management. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Facilities Emerald Publishing

Customer satisfaction and organisational justice

Facilities , Volume 22 (7/8): 12 – Jun 1, 2004

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0263-2772
DOI
10.1108/02632770410547543
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Applies organisational justice theory to facilities management with the aim of increasing customer satisfaction with the service received. Provides an overview of organisational justice theory, and reviews the numerous different forms that this may take. Although there is strong theoretical support for participative decision making, in practice it often leads to conflict and delays. Two‐way communication appears to represent the most effective form. The conclusions are based upon theoretical support as well as semi‐structured interviews and observations in an organisational setting. The conclusions drawn do not have the benefits of more objective quantitative research methods. Contributes to practical understanding of how to maintain customer satisfaction in the facilities management industry and the theoretical reasons why the proposed methods will be effective. Argues that the impact of organisational justice on employee satisfaction can be applied to customer satisfaction with specific reference to facilities management.

Journal

FacilitiesEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2004

Keywords: Facilities; Decision making; Customer satisfaction; Service industries

References