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Culture as mediator: co-regulation, self-regulation, and middle school mathematics achievement

Culture as mediator: co-regulation, self-regulation, and middle school mathematics achievement PurposeSelf-regulation is defined as strategic, metacognitive behavior, motivation, and cognition aimed at a goal (Zimmmerman & Schunk, 2011). Co-regulation, arguably more aligned with norms in communal cultures, is the process of learners sharing “a common problem-solving plane” through which self-regulatory strategies are learned (Hadwin & Oshaige, 2011, p.247). This article investigates the impact of co-regulation on self-regulation and math achievement for culturally diverse students.Design/methodology/approachThis empirical study utilized structural equation modeling framework to estimate the affects of co-regulation on self-regulation and math achievement, as measured by the statewide-standardized test. Surveys measuring student use of co-regulatory and self-regulatory strategies and standardized math test scores were collected from 625 7th and 8th grade students in a suburban district outside a southeastern urban center in the 2011-2012 academic year. FindingsResults indicated co-regulation is positively and significantly related to self-regulation strategy use among students in the sample. Self-regulation and co-regulation were positively related to math achievement. Data suggests the modeled relationship of co-regulation, self-regulation, and achievement may vary by ethnic group. Originality/valueA large body of literature documents the impact of self-regulation on student achievement, though there is less focusing on students of color. This work expands that body of literature by examining co-regulation as a predictor of self-regulation and its mediated effects on student achievement for students of color. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal for Multicultural Education Emerald Publishing

Culture as mediator: co-regulation, self-regulation, and middle school mathematics achievement

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References (46)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2053-535X
DOI
10.1108/JME-05-2016-0032
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeSelf-regulation is defined as strategic, metacognitive behavior, motivation, and cognition aimed at a goal (Zimmmerman & Schunk, 2011). Co-regulation, arguably more aligned with norms in communal cultures, is the process of learners sharing “a common problem-solving plane” through which self-regulatory strategies are learned (Hadwin & Oshaige, 2011, p.247). This article investigates the impact of co-regulation on self-regulation and math achievement for culturally diverse students.Design/methodology/approachThis empirical study utilized structural equation modeling framework to estimate the affects of co-regulation on self-regulation and math achievement, as measured by the statewide-standardized test. Surveys measuring student use of co-regulatory and self-regulatory strategies and standardized math test scores were collected from 625 7th and 8th grade students in a suburban district outside a southeastern urban center in the 2011-2012 academic year. FindingsResults indicated co-regulation is positively and significantly related to self-regulation strategy use among students in the sample. Self-regulation and co-regulation were positively related to math achievement. Data suggests the modeled relationship of co-regulation, self-regulation, and achievement may vary by ethnic group. Originality/valueA large body of literature documents the impact of self-regulation on student achievement, though there is less focusing on students of color. This work expands that body of literature by examining co-regulation as a predictor of self-regulation and its mediated effects on student achievement for students of color.

Journal

Journal for Multicultural EducationEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 8, 2016

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