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Cross‐university collaboration for work‐place learning: a case study

Cross‐university collaboration for work‐place learning: a case study Purpose – Research into skills level of the workforce in the West Midlands in England has identified a shortage of graduate skills and that these are needed for the region to regain its competitiveness in the national and international markets of the twenty‐first century. The purpose of this paper is to explore the practices that enabled collaboration between higher education organisations to meet the needs of local industries and businesses through work‐place learning. Design/methodology/approach – The objectives of the case study are to review the background to the initiative described and the organisation and the activities undertaken. The paper reflects on the factors that enabled the collaboration to be effective and on those that jeopardised the potential success of the group. First, an overview of the case is given, starting with the concept for the project that was the focus of the collaboration. Next the organisation of the partnership is outlined and then the process of the development of the foundation degrees. Factors that impact on the effectiveness of the collaboration are explored drawing on illustrative extracts selected from the data. Findings – Key findings corroborate previous research that posited that success, or failure, of collaboration is due to a number of factors: mutual benefit, a change in product, process or output, stated, emergent and unstated aims, perceived benefits and mutual trust. Originality/value – The paper demonstrates that even where all these factors exist there may be unanticipated events that impact on the success of the project. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning Emerald Publishing

Cross‐university collaboration for work‐place learning: a case study

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2042-3896
DOI
10.1108/20423891111085401
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Research into skills level of the workforce in the West Midlands in England has identified a shortage of graduate skills and that these are needed for the region to regain its competitiveness in the national and international markets of the twenty‐first century. The purpose of this paper is to explore the practices that enabled collaboration between higher education organisations to meet the needs of local industries and businesses through work‐place learning. Design/methodology/approach – The objectives of the case study are to review the background to the initiative described and the organisation and the activities undertaken. The paper reflects on the factors that enabled the collaboration to be effective and on those that jeopardised the potential success of the group. First, an overview of the case is given, starting with the concept for the project that was the focus of the collaboration. Next the organisation of the partnership is outlined and then the process of the development of the foundation degrees. Factors that impact on the effectiveness of the collaboration are explored drawing on illustrative extracts selected from the data. Findings – Key findings corroborate previous research that posited that success, or failure, of collaboration is due to a number of factors: mutual benefit, a change in product, process or output, stated, emergent and unstated aims, perceived benefits and mutual trust. Originality/value – The paper demonstrates that even where all these factors exist there may be unanticipated events that impact on the success of the project.

Journal

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based LearningEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 29, 2010

Keywords: Skills shortages; Skills; Workplace learning; Higher education; United Kingdom

References