Cross‐cultural factorial validity of the academic motivation scale

Cross‐cultural factorial validity of the academic motivation scale Purpose – The purpose of this study was to examine the factorial validity of the academic motivation scale (AMS), including mean structures and reliabilities across two culturally diverse samples. Thus, the study assesses the fit of the seven‐factor conceptualization of AMS to a non‐Western context. Design/methodology/approach – Survey questionnaire was used to elicit responses from undergraduate business students from universities in the USA (267) and Ghana (262). The data were analyzed using the multi‐group CFA technique in LISREL 8.7, to assess measurement equivalency and the fit of the AMS to the non‐Western context. Findings – After baseline models were established, a hierarchy of successively restrictive models were specified and estimated. Support was found for factorial, metric, and scalar invariance across the two samples, but different levels of psychometric soundness exist. Research limitations/implications – In spite of the low reliabilities in the non‐Western context, the AMS has the potential to measure the same traits in the same way across diverse groups. Practical implications – Researchers, educators, and policy makers interested in this field of study may be confident in employing the AMS to investigate students' motives, including cross‐cultural motivational studies. Organizations may also use the AMS as a pre‐employment tool to understand college graduates motivational profile for better person‐organization match. Originality/value – The AMS has been developed and validated in the Western context, but its validity in non‐Western contexts remains unexplored. This study provides a cross‐cultural comparative test of the seven‐factor conceptualization. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal Emerald Publishing

Cross‐cultural factorial validity of the academic motivation scale

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1352-7606
D.O.I.
10.1108/CCM-11-2011-0100
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this study was to examine the factorial validity of the academic motivation scale (AMS), including mean structures and reliabilities across two culturally diverse samples. Thus, the study assesses the fit of the seven‐factor conceptualization of AMS to a non‐Western context. Design/methodology/approach – Survey questionnaire was used to elicit responses from undergraduate business students from universities in the USA (267) and Ghana (262). The data were analyzed using the multi‐group CFA technique in LISREL 8.7, to assess measurement equivalency and the fit of the AMS to the non‐Western context. Findings – After baseline models were established, a hierarchy of successively restrictive models were specified and estimated. Support was found for factorial, metric, and scalar invariance across the two samples, but different levels of psychometric soundness exist. Research limitations/implications – In spite of the low reliabilities in the non‐Western context, the AMS has the potential to measure the same traits in the same way across diverse groups. Practical implications – Researchers, educators, and policy makers interested in this field of study may be confident in employing the AMS to investigate students' motives, including cross‐cultural motivational studies. Organizations may also use the AMS as a pre‐employment tool to understand college graduates motivational profile for better person‐organization match. Originality/value – The AMS has been developed and validated in the Western context, but its validity in non‐Western contexts remains unexplored. This study provides a cross‐cultural comparative test of the seven‐factor conceptualization.

Journal

Cross Cultural Management: An International JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 28, 2014

Keywords: Ghana; Academic motivation; Cross‐cultural validity; Factorial invariance; Multi‐group CFA; USA

References

  • Intrinsic, extrinsic, and amotivation orientations: their role in university adjustment, stress, well‐being, and subsequent academic performance
    Baker, S.R.
  • Facilitating the acceptance of organizational change: the importance of self‐determination
    Gagne, M.; Koestner, R.; Zuckerman, M.
  • Where intrinsic job satisfaction fails to work: national moderators of intrinsic motivation
    Huang, X.; Van De Vliert, E.
  • How cultural values affect the impact of abusive supervision on worker attitudes
    Kernan, M.C.; Watson, S.; Chen, F.F.; Kim, T.G.
  • On the relations among work value orientations, psychological need satisfaction, and job outcomes: a self‐determination theory approach
    Vansteenkiste, M.; Neyrinck, B.; Niemiec, C.P.; Soenens, B.; De Witte, H.; Van den Broeck, A.

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