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Coverage by smoke‐free workplace policies by race/ethnicity and health outcomes Can workplace health policies improve worker health?

Coverage by smoke‐free workplace policies by race/ethnicity and health outcomes Can workplace... Purpose – The present research has three goals: to examine the prevalence of smoke‐free workplace policies; to examine how coverage by a smoke‐free workplace policy differs among racial/ethnic groups; and to examine the impact of smoke‐free workplace policy (SFWP) coverage on health outcomes. Design/methodology/approach – The research uses secondary analysis of data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) from 1998‐2006. Findings – It was found that SFWP coverage is below government goals – especially for Hispanic workers and that SFWP coverage was associated with health outcomes. Research limitations/implications – The relatively slow progress in coverage by smoke‐free workplace policies during the last eight years suggests the possibility that a ceiling has been reached in smoke‐free workplace policy coverage. Limitations include factors that might negatively influence SFWP reporting (e.g. lack of knowledge about SFWP; language barriers), availability of data after 2006, and a cross‐sectional design for health outcomes. Practical implications – The findings suggest that there is health value in SFWP, but that coverage is not at 100 percent and a federal‐level mandate might be necessary to reach that level. In situations where customers are allowed to smoke, it may be more difficult to justify and enforce a smoke‐free workplace policy. Originality/value – This is the first study to examine SFWP coverage by race over time. This study allows for examination of progress toward published SFWP goals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Workplace Health Management Emerald Publishing

Coverage by smoke‐free workplace policies by race/ethnicity and health outcomes Can workplace health policies improve worker health?

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1753-8351
DOI
10.1108/17538351011055014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The present research has three goals: to examine the prevalence of smoke‐free workplace policies; to examine how coverage by a smoke‐free workplace policy differs among racial/ethnic groups; and to examine the impact of smoke‐free workplace policy (SFWP) coverage on health outcomes. Design/methodology/approach – The research uses secondary analysis of data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) from 1998‐2006. Findings – It was found that SFWP coverage is below government goals – especially for Hispanic workers and that SFWP coverage was associated with health outcomes. Research limitations/implications – The relatively slow progress in coverage by smoke‐free workplace policies during the last eight years suggests the possibility that a ceiling has been reached in smoke‐free workplace policy coverage. Limitations include factors that might negatively influence SFWP reporting (e.g. lack of knowledge about SFWP; language barriers), availability of data after 2006, and a cross‐sectional design for health outcomes. Practical implications – The findings suggest that there is health value in SFWP, but that coverage is not at 100 percent and a federal‐level mandate might be necessary to reach that level. In situations where customers are allowed to smoke, it may be more difficult to justify and enforce a smoke‐free workplace policy. Originality/value – This is the first study to examine SFWP coverage by race over time. This study allows for examination of progress toward published SFWP goals.

Journal

International Journal of Workplace Health ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 29, 2010

Keywords: Business policy; Cigarettes; Health and safety; Personal health; Ethnic groups; United States of America

References