Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

CORROSION PATENTS

CORROSION PATENTS Tanker linings Cleaning fuel tank surfaces Concrete mixes may be used as Apparatus for cleaning oil, scale, topped pipes 49 into the compartment anti-corrosion protective coatings on etc., from metal surfaces of fuel tanks 3 where oil and solids separate out and steel surfaces, especially in oil tanker and fittings comprises a pair of com­ the cleaned fluid passes below the holds. These latter are alternately municating containers, one to receive partition 2 into the compartment 4 filled with ballast sea water and crude cleaning fluid and having therein heat­ for re-use. A make-up tank 5 supplies oil, which raises a severe corrosion fresh fluid either through a lead 9 ing means, and the other to receive problem. Emulsified polyvinyl ace­ returned contaminated cleaning fluid, controlled by a ball valve 53 or through tate in concrete is found to be cor­ and means for projecting the cleaning a hand-controlled lead 6. The valve rosion-resistant for this purpose, and fluid against surfaces to be cleaned. 53 opens when the oil-cleaning fluid sufficiently flexible to withstand the The containers may be formed as a interface falls below a predetermined ship's vibration. A good formulation single tank having an insulated par­ level 146. An interface level indicator is one to three parts of aggregate to one 60 is fitted. The apparatus may include tition 2 forming compartments 3 and part of cement, with 0.07 to 0.22 of 4, the compartment 4 carrying heating a telescopic projector 61 (Fig. 6) polyvinyl acetate, and all gauging coils 35 and the compartment 3 having adapted to be mounted inside a fuel water being supplied by the emulsion overflow gates 51 and sludge doors 34 tank 84 and having a jet-reaction- if required. This mix is found to have for removal of oil or solids separated operated revolving nozzle head 77. good adhesion to steel when applied at from the returned fluid. Fluid is Elongation of the projector is con­ one to three-sixteenths inch thickness, trolled by wires 96 passing round a removed from the compartment 4 by either by trowel or spray. Preferably pair of rollers connected to hydraulic a pump 16 through leads 13 and 39 the metal surface is scale-free, and the above and below the coils 35, an rams operated by pressure from the aggregate largely devoid of dust, and it arrangement permitting temperature pump 16. Forcing apart of the rollers is carefully pointed out that this speci­ control by valves 14, 40. Fluid from by the rams telescopes the projector fication concerns lime cements, the pump 16 is sprayed by projector 61. A two-nozzle hand-operated pro­ whereas B.P. 666,865, an earlier but jector may be included in the appara­ means on to surfaces to be cleared and otherwise similar one, relates to tus. The fluid sprayed may include is returned with entrained matter by alumina cements.—Brit. Pat. 732,110, a further pump having a fixed and a solvent and may be mixed in a drum Vinyl Products Ltd., Surrey. a wandering suction lead. The return 12 (Fig. 1) and forwarded by the fluid passes via a preheating coil 43 pump 16 to the tank 5.—Brit. Pat. in the compartment 4 and open- 696,631 (1949), R. W. Groom. High temperature alloys Nickel chromium cobalt alloys have good creep, corrosion and temperature resistance at 750 to 850°C. The chromium content of similar known alloys is reduced to allow the solution of titanium, aluminium and molyb­ denum to give a composition of: 4 to 12% chromium, 10 to 55% cobalt, 0.5 to 8% titanium, 0.3 to 8% alu­ minium, 0 to 15% molybdenum, 0 to 0.5% carbon, 0.001 to 0.01% boron, and the remainder nickel. The aluminium and titanium are preferably kept below 5%.—Brit. Pat. 733, 489, Mond Nickel Co., London. Scale-resistant alloy steels A modification is described of the alloy in B.P. 638,110, for scale and creep resistant alloy steels used at 600°C. The chief aim is to develop such alloys which can be welded or brazed without undesirable hardening effects, and have a tensile strength of about 70 tons p.s.i. The main feature is to restrict the chromium content to 16 to 17%, the other components being : 0.3% each of silicon, niobium and vanadium, 0.1% carbon, 0.5% manganese and 0.4% molybdenum, the remainder being iron.—Brit. Pat. 733, 146, William Jessop & Sons Ltd. 284 CORROSION TECHNOLOGY September 1955 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials Emerald Publishing

CORROSION PATENTS

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials , Volume 2 (9): 1 – Sep 1, 1955

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/corrosion-patents-9s1w6k27C1
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0003-5599
DOI
10.1108/eb019102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Tanker linings Cleaning fuel tank surfaces Concrete mixes may be used as Apparatus for cleaning oil, scale, topped pipes 49 into the compartment anti-corrosion protective coatings on etc., from metal surfaces of fuel tanks 3 where oil and solids separate out and steel surfaces, especially in oil tanker and fittings comprises a pair of com­ the cleaned fluid passes below the holds. These latter are alternately municating containers, one to receive partition 2 into the compartment 4 filled with ballast sea water and crude cleaning fluid and having therein heat­ for re-use. A make-up tank 5 supplies oil, which raises a severe corrosion fresh fluid either through a lead 9 ing means, and the other to receive problem. Emulsified polyvinyl ace­ returned contaminated cleaning fluid, controlled by a ball valve 53 or through tate in concrete is found to be cor­ and means for projecting the cleaning a hand-controlled lead 6. The valve rosion-resistant for this purpose, and fluid against surfaces to be cleaned. 53 opens when the oil-cleaning fluid sufficiently flexible to withstand the The containers may be formed as a interface falls below a predetermined ship's vibration. A good formulation single tank having an insulated par­ level 146. An interface level indicator is one to three parts of aggregate to one 60 is fitted. The apparatus may include tition 2 forming compartments 3 and part of cement, with 0.07 to 0.22 of 4, the compartment 4 carrying heating a telescopic projector 61 (Fig. 6) polyvinyl acetate, and all gauging coils 35 and the compartment 3 having adapted to be mounted inside a fuel water being supplied by the emulsion overflow gates 51 and sludge doors 34 tank 84 and having a jet-reaction- if required. This mix is found to have for removal of oil or solids separated operated revolving nozzle head 77. good adhesion to steel when applied at from the returned fluid. Fluid is Elongation of the projector is con­ one to three-sixteenths inch thickness, trolled by wires 96 passing round a removed from the compartment 4 by either by trowel or spray. Preferably pair of rollers connected to hydraulic a pump 16 through leads 13 and 39 the metal surface is scale-free, and the above and below the coils 35, an rams operated by pressure from the aggregate largely devoid of dust, and it arrangement permitting temperature pump 16. Forcing apart of the rollers is carefully pointed out that this speci­ control by valves 14, 40. Fluid from by the rams telescopes the projector fication concerns lime cements, the pump 16 is sprayed by projector 61. A two-nozzle hand-operated pro­ whereas B.P. 666,865, an earlier but jector may be included in the appara­ means on to surfaces to be cleared and otherwise similar one, relates to tus. The fluid sprayed may include is returned with entrained matter by alumina cements.—Brit. Pat. 732,110, a further pump having a fixed and a solvent and may be mixed in a drum Vinyl Products Ltd., Surrey. a wandering suction lead. The return 12 (Fig. 1) and forwarded by the fluid passes via a preheating coil 43 pump 16 to the tank 5.—Brit. Pat. in the compartment 4 and open- 696,631 (1949), R. W. Groom. High temperature alloys Nickel chromium cobalt alloys have good creep, corrosion and temperature resistance at 750 to 850°C. The chromium content of similar known alloys is reduced to allow the solution of titanium, aluminium and molyb­ denum to give a composition of: 4 to 12% chromium, 10 to 55% cobalt, 0.5 to 8% titanium, 0.3 to 8% alu­ minium, 0 to 15% molybdenum, 0 to 0.5% carbon, 0.001 to 0.01% boron, and the remainder nickel. The aluminium and titanium are preferably kept below 5%.—Brit. Pat. 733, 489, Mond Nickel Co., London. Scale-resistant alloy steels A modification is described of the alloy in B.P. 638,110, for scale and creep resistant alloy steels used at 600°C. The chief aim is to develop such alloys which can be welded or brazed without undesirable hardening effects, and have a tensile strength of about 70 tons p.s.i. The main feature is to restrict the chromium content to 16 to 17%, the other components being : 0.3% each of silicon, niobium and vanadium, 0.1% carbon, 0.5% manganese and 0.4% molybdenum, the remainder being iron.—Brit. Pat. 733, 146, William Jessop & Sons Ltd. 284 CORROSION TECHNOLOGY September 1955

Journal

Anti-Corrosion Methods and MaterialsEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1955

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month