Corrosion by Agricultural Chemicals CONSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AND FINISHES TESTED

Corrosion by Agricultural Chemicals CONSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AND FINISHES TESTED Corrosion by Agricultural Chemicals CONSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AND FINISHES TESTED all specimens contacted with DDT dust, A T the Texas Engineering Experiment maintained at values actually used in prac­ Toxaphene-svtlphuv dust, potassium cyan- Station , College Station, Texas tice. In cases where high and low concen­ trations were employed both extremes were ates and the arsenate dust insecticides. U.S.A., the corrosive effect upon structural materials and finishes of commonly used tested. Micrometer measurements were The prepolymerised furan coating, pre­ agricultural chemicals has been investigated obtained for all specimens with an applied ceded by a wash primer of the polyvinyl by C. F. Schrieber as one phase of the finish, although visual effects were easily butyral group exhibited the best overall general agricultural aviation research pro­ noted. finish. The finish was attacked vigorously gramme supervised by F . E. Weick. Only by only five solutions in the partially sub­ The atmospheric tests were run using two structural materials and one finish merged tests: TEPP, Aramite, Parathion, the same concentration system as was used were found resistant to the sprays and Dieldrin and Heptachlor. This finish with the submerged samples, although in dusts commonly used in crop treatment by bonded very well to both 24S-T3 Alclad this phase of work all dusts and solid fer­ aircraft. aluminium and chrome-molybdenum steel. tilisers were applied in a paste form. All tests were run using the alternate dip In the atmospheric tests the furan finish Type 302 stainless steel and polyester method. Every three days the samples on 4130 chrome-molybdenum steel also plastic reinforced with fibre-glass offered were placed in contact with the testing showed excellent bonding properties with complete protection from all of the solu­ medium and then replaced in the atmo­ all solutions contacted. As the test pro­ tions investigated. Monel metal resisted spheric environment. The tests were gressed this finish remained intact and no corrosion reasonably well, but brass, conducted at varying temperatures and swelling was noted. TEPP solution caused aluminium alloy and chrome-molybdenum humidity over a period of 79 days. steel were all destroyed by certain of the very slight blisters at 60 days, although good metal protection was still available agricultural chemicals. Rotational atmospheric tests were con­ at 79 days' exposure. A furan protective coating with a butyral ducted on samples that were contacted The furan finish on 24S-T3 Alclad primer demonstrated the best overall finish with one solution, allowed to remain under aluminium was attacked only by the com­ characteristics, although none of the that environment in the atmosphere for mercial fertiliser (8-8-8). Destruction of applied finishes that were tested withstood three days, then washed clean, dried, and the metal under the finish caused the all of the agricultural chemicals without retreated with another solution. These surface finish to disrupt and crack. Bond­ damage. tests were conducted for 79 days using 26 ing as demonstrated by this finish on different solutions. Th e 28 agricultural chemicals used in aluminium was excellent to the point that the experiments were as follows: insecti­ Observations and micrometer measure­ TCA did not react with the metal through cides—Aldrin, Chlordane, TEPP, Toxa- ments were taken daily for the first week the surface scratch. phene, Aramite, BHC, DDT dust, Toxa- on all tests. After the first week, readings phene-sulphur dust, Parathion, arsenate Atmospheric results showed that the were taken at greater time intervals. dust, Dieldrin, Heptachlor, DD T plus sol­ agricultural chemicals are practically in­ When a test with an applied finish was vent, and sulphur; herbicides—potassium active in destructiveness when washed concluded, the coupon was washed, allowed from the samples after use, implying that cyanate (high and low concentration), to dry and tested for bonding properties. a furan finish would be highly acceptable sodium cyanamide, TCA, ammonium sul- A wire brush or metal scraper was used in if the hopper or spray tank was washed phamate, 2, 4-D, 2, 4, 5,-T, and CMU; conjunction with this phase of the pro­ fungicides—sulphur, carbamates (high and after each use. cedure. If the finish was in good condition, low concentration), and Bordeaux mixture; micrometer measurements were made and defoliant—magnesium chlorate (high and the sample was noted for swelling effects. low concentration); and fertilisers—liquid In general, the visual observations were Sherardizing. In 1900, while investi­ fertiliser (high and low concentration), sufficient to determine if a finish was gating the heat treatment of metals, Mr. 8-8-8 commercial fertiliser, and ammonium acceptable. Sherard Cowper-Coles found that, when nitrate. various articles are packed in zinc powder In the partially submerged tests, type and heated, a rust-proof surface was pro­ The structural materials tested included 302 stainless steel demonstrated complete duced, and he patented this method of steel the most frequently used metals, basic resistance to corrosion throughout the test protection under the name of Sherardizing. finishes, plastics and doped fabrics. Since period. In the atmospheric tests, type 302 The term is only applicable to a heat- there are more than 3,000 protective coat­ stainless steel exhibited excellent resistance treatment process which uses zinc dust as ings on the U.S. market, only the funda­ to all materials with the exception of the medium for rust-proofing. mental finishes could be included in this Toxaphene and sulphur dust insecticides. investigation. Minute pitting commenced on the steel These are two of the points explained at 60 days and gave only very slight metal in a revised, pocket-size edition of a booklet A total of 512 specimens of structural damage. published by Zinc Alloy Rust-Proofing Co. materials and finishes were tested partially Ltd. and Zinc Alloy Co. Ltd. (62 pp., submerged, and 297 were tested under The two makes of fibreglass-reinforced price 2s. net). A brief history of the pro­ atmospheric conditions. polyester plastic were tested for 40 and 50 cess is followed by an explanation of what All partially submerged tests were con­ days, respectively. There was excellent Sherardizing is and how it is carried out. resistance to all solutions. ducted at room temperature and based on Then there is a chapter on its applications. an aircraft spray coverage of 4 gal./acre. Monel metal was excellent in the par­ The Sherardizing of screw threads and of All chemical concentrations per acre, as tially submerged tests with the exception aluminium articles is discussed and a fur­ taken from entomology laboratory data and of the highly concentrated potassium ther chapter summarises the limitations of agricultural chemical manufacturers' re­ cyanate solution which gave a slight pitting the process. The final chapters are devoted ports, were calculated on a proportional effect. Although several chemicals dis­ to various finishes obtainable; data obtained level to correspond to 1 lb. acre basis. coloured Monel metal, no major destruc­ from tests of treated specimens; cost of Submerged tests were carried out in 125- tion was evident. Under an atmospheric the material required; and diagrams com­ ml. glass containers with specimen coupons environment Monel metal exhibited higher paring the process with other means of that extended in both the liquid and vapour corrosion rates than during the submerged protection. regions of the vessel. Concentrations were tests. Pining commenced at 50 days upon CORROSION TECHNOLOGY, October 1954 295 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials Emerald Publishing

Corrosion by Agricultural Chemicals CONSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AND FINISHES TESTED

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, Volume 1 (8): 1 – Aug 1, 1954

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/corrosion-by-agricultural-chemicals-constructional-materials-and-AXnOcy0YYt
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0003-5599
DOI
10.1108/eb018975
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Corrosion by Agricultural Chemicals CONSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS AND FINISHES TESTED all specimens contacted with DDT dust, A T the Texas Engineering Experiment maintained at values actually used in prac­ Toxaphene-svtlphuv dust, potassium cyan- Station , College Station, Texas tice. In cases where high and low concen­ trations were employed both extremes were ates and the arsenate dust insecticides. U.S.A., the corrosive effect upon structural materials and finishes of commonly used tested. Micrometer measurements were The prepolymerised furan coating, pre­ agricultural chemicals has been investigated obtained for all specimens with an applied ceded by a wash primer of the polyvinyl by C. F. Schrieber as one phase of the finish, although visual effects were easily butyral group exhibited the best overall general agricultural aviation research pro­ noted. finish. The finish was attacked vigorously gramme supervised by F . E. Weick. Only by only five solutions in the partially sub­ The atmospheric tests were run using two structural materials and one finish merged tests: TEPP, Aramite, Parathion, the same concentration system as was used were found resistant to the sprays and Dieldrin and Heptachlor. This finish with the submerged samples, although in dusts commonly used in crop treatment by bonded very well to both 24S-T3 Alclad this phase of work all dusts and solid fer­ aircraft. aluminium and chrome-molybdenum steel. tilisers were applied in a paste form. All tests were run using the alternate dip In the atmospheric tests the furan finish Type 302 stainless steel and polyester method. Every three days the samples on 4130 chrome-molybdenum steel also plastic reinforced with fibre-glass offered were placed in contact with the testing showed excellent bonding properties with complete protection from all of the solu­ medium and then replaced in the atmo­ all solutions contacted. As the test pro­ tions investigated. Monel metal resisted spheric environment. The tests were gressed this finish remained intact and no corrosion reasonably well, but brass, conducted at varying temperatures and swelling was noted. TEPP solution caused aluminium alloy and chrome-molybdenum humidity over a period of 79 days. steel were all destroyed by certain of the very slight blisters at 60 days, although good metal protection was still available agricultural chemicals. Rotational atmospheric tests were con­ at 79 days' exposure. A furan protective coating with a butyral ducted on samples that were contacted The furan finish on 24S-T3 Alclad primer demonstrated the best overall finish with one solution, allowed to remain under aluminium was attacked only by the com­ characteristics, although none of the that environment in the atmosphere for mercial fertiliser (8-8-8). Destruction of applied finishes that were tested withstood three days, then washed clean, dried, and the metal under the finish caused the all of the agricultural chemicals without retreated with another solution. These surface finish to disrupt and crack. Bond­ damage. tests were conducted for 79 days using 26 ing as demonstrated by this finish on different solutions. Th e 28 agricultural chemicals used in aluminium was excellent to the point that the experiments were as follows: insecti­ Observations and micrometer measure­ TCA did not react with the metal through cides—Aldrin, Chlordane, TEPP, Toxa- ments were taken daily for the first week the surface scratch. phene, Aramite, BHC, DDT dust, Toxa- on all tests. After the first week, readings phene-sulphur dust, Parathion, arsenate Atmospheric results showed that the were taken at greater time intervals. dust, Dieldrin, Heptachlor, DD T plus sol­ agricultural chemicals are practically in­ When a test with an applied finish was vent, and sulphur; herbicides—potassium active in destructiveness when washed concluded, the coupon was washed, allowed from the samples after use, implying that cyanate (high and low concentration), to dry and tested for bonding properties. a furan finish would be highly acceptable sodium cyanamide, TCA, ammonium sul- A wire brush or metal scraper was used in if the hopper or spray tank was washed phamate, 2, 4-D, 2, 4, 5,-T, and CMU; conjunction with this phase of the pro­ fungicides—sulphur, carbamates (high and after each use. cedure. If the finish was in good condition, low concentration), and Bordeaux mixture; micrometer measurements were made and defoliant—magnesium chlorate (high and the sample was noted for swelling effects. low concentration); and fertilisers—liquid In general, the visual observations were Sherardizing. In 1900, while investi­ fertiliser (high and low concentration), sufficient to determine if a finish was gating the heat treatment of metals, Mr. 8-8-8 commercial fertiliser, and ammonium acceptable. Sherard Cowper-Coles found that, when nitrate. various articles are packed in zinc powder In the partially submerged tests, type and heated, a rust-proof surface was pro­ The structural materials tested included 302 stainless steel demonstrated complete duced, and he patented this method of steel the most frequently used metals, basic resistance to corrosion throughout the test protection under the name of Sherardizing. finishes, plastics and doped fabrics. Since period. In the atmospheric tests, type 302 The term is only applicable to a heat- there are more than 3,000 protective coat­ stainless steel exhibited excellent resistance treatment process which uses zinc dust as ings on the U.S. market, only the funda­ to all materials with the exception of the medium for rust-proofing. mental finishes could be included in this Toxaphene and sulphur dust insecticides. investigation. Minute pitting commenced on the steel These are two of the points explained at 60 days and gave only very slight metal in a revised, pocket-size edition of a booklet A total of 512 specimens of structural damage. published by Zinc Alloy Rust-Proofing Co. materials and finishes were tested partially Ltd. and Zinc Alloy Co. Ltd. (62 pp., submerged, and 297 were tested under The two makes of fibreglass-reinforced price 2s. net). A brief history of the pro­ atmospheric conditions. polyester plastic were tested for 40 and 50 cess is followed by an explanation of what All partially submerged tests were con­ days, respectively. There was excellent Sherardizing is and how it is carried out. resistance to all solutions. ducted at room temperature and based on Then there is a chapter on its applications. an aircraft spray coverage of 4 gal./acre. Monel metal was excellent in the par­ The Sherardizing of screw threads and of All chemical concentrations per acre, as tially submerged tests with the exception aluminium articles is discussed and a fur­ taken from entomology laboratory data and of the highly concentrated potassium ther chapter summarises the limitations of agricultural chemical manufacturers' re­ cyanate solution which gave a slight pitting the process. The final chapters are devoted ports, were calculated on a proportional effect. Although several chemicals dis­ to various finishes obtainable; data obtained level to correspond to 1 lb. acre basis. coloured Monel metal, no major destruc­ from tests of treated specimens; cost of Submerged tests were carried out in 125- tion was evident. Under an atmospheric the material required; and diagrams com­ ml. glass containers with specimen coupons environment Monel metal exhibited higher paring the process with other means of that extended in both the liquid and vapour corrosion rates than during the submerged protection. regions of the vessel. Concentrations were tests. Pining commenced at 50 days upon CORROSION TECHNOLOGY, October 1954 295

Journal

Anti-Corrosion Methods and MaterialsEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 1954

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off