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Correlates of work-alienation and positive job attitudes in high- and low-status workers

Correlates of work-alienation and positive job attitudes in high- and low-status workers PurposeThe concept of alienation boasts a long history in the academic literature. However, their empirical relations are not clear. The purpose of this paper is to test a model of predictors and outcomes of alienation. Since occupational status plays a key role in alienation processes, such model was tested with high- and low-status workers.Design/methodology/approachParticipants were 340 workers holding high-status (n=98) and low-status (n=242) positions. Data were collected through a self-report questionnaire. The authors verified the hypothesized relationships by means of a structural equation modelling, simultaneously tested on high- and low-status workers.FindingsResults showed that individual determinants of alienation, i.e. locus of control, appear to play a more relevant role for high-status professionals, whereas organizational dimensions, i.e. perception of decision making, have an impact only for low-status workers. Relational variables, i.e. work-family conflict, fostered alienation, regardless the status. Concerning outcomes, alienation decreased both job satisfaction and job involvement.Research limitations/implicationsThe specificities of the cultural context have to be considered. Generalizing the results to other cultural contexts requires caution.Practical implicationsWork alienation has a negative influence on work attitudes that can be better managed by the knowledge of alienation’s correlates and peculiarities.Originality/valueThe study confirms the relevance of alienation for workers’ satisfaction and involvement highlighting the difference between high- and low-status workers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Career Development International Emerald Publishing

Correlates of work-alienation and positive job attitudes in high- and low-status workers

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References (75)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1362-0436
DOI
10.1108/CDI-03-2016-0027
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe concept of alienation boasts a long history in the academic literature. However, their empirical relations are not clear. The purpose of this paper is to test a model of predictors and outcomes of alienation. Since occupational status plays a key role in alienation processes, such model was tested with high- and low-status workers.Design/methodology/approachParticipants were 340 workers holding high-status (n=98) and low-status (n=242) positions. Data were collected through a self-report questionnaire. The authors verified the hypothesized relationships by means of a structural equation modelling, simultaneously tested on high- and low-status workers.FindingsResults showed that individual determinants of alienation, i.e. locus of control, appear to play a more relevant role for high-status professionals, whereas organizational dimensions, i.e. perception of decision making, have an impact only for low-status workers. Relational variables, i.e. work-family conflict, fostered alienation, regardless the status. Concerning outcomes, alienation decreased both job satisfaction and job involvement.Research limitations/implicationsThe specificities of the cultural context have to be considered. Generalizing the results to other cultural contexts requires caution.Practical implicationsWork alienation has a negative influence on work attitudes that can be better managed by the knowledge of alienation’s correlates and peculiarities.Originality/valueThe study confirms the relevance of alienation for workers’ satisfaction and involvement highlighting the difference between high- and low-status workers.

Journal

Career Development InternationalEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 14, 2016

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