Corn starch dextrin changes intestinal microbiota and its metabolic activity in rats fed a basal and high-fat diet

Corn starch dextrin changes intestinal microbiota and its metabolic activity in rats fed a basal... PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to determine the influence of low-fat and high-fat diets supplemented with dextrin obtained from corn starch on the numbers and relative proportions of enteric bacteria Bacteroidetes (Bacteroides, Prevotella), Actinobacteria (Bifidobacterium) and Firmicutes (Clostridium, Lactobacillus). Moreover, basic indicators of gastrointestinal function (among other things: epidydymal fat mass, mass with contents, pH in the colon, cecum, small intestine, fecal enzymes were investigation) and short-chain fatty acids are analyzed.Design/methodology/approachIn vivo experimental studies in rats (analized samples of the ileal, cecal and colonic digesta; pH; blood serum; fecal enzymes); determination of the number of bacteria – fluorescence in situ hybridization; and determination of type and concentration SCFA – HPLC were considered.FindingsNo statistically significant differences in final body weight were found between rats fed low-fat and high-fat diets supplemented with dextrin. In rats fed the low-fat diet with dextrin, the gut microbiota composition was as follows: 42.74 percent Bacteroises and Prevotella (Bacteroidetes), 35.28 percent Clostridium and Lactobacilllus (Firmicutes) and 21.98 percent Bifidobacterium (Actinobacteria), while in rats fed the high-fat diet with dextrin it was similar. Irrespective of the diet type, supplementation with dextrin enhances bacterial glycolytic activity and the cecal production of total SCFAs, with strongly increased propionate and decreased butyrate fermentation.Practical implicationsDextrin may enrich food or be a component of functional foods.Originality/valueDextrin from corn starch may contribute to changes in the composition of intestinal microbiota. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Food Journal Emerald Publishing

Corn starch dextrin changes intestinal microbiota and its metabolic activity in rats fed a basal and high-fat diet

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0007-070X
DOI
10.1108/BFJ-02-2019-0083
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to determine the influence of low-fat and high-fat diets supplemented with dextrin obtained from corn starch on the numbers and relative proportions of enteric bacteria Bacteroidetes (Bacteroides, Prevotella), Actinobacteria (Bifidobacterium) and Firmicutes (Clostridium, Lactobacillus). Moreover, basic indicators of gastrointestinal function (among other things: epidydymal fat mass, mass with contents, pH in the colon, cecum, small intestine, fecal enzymes were investigation) and short-chain fatty acids are analyzed.Design/methodology/approachIn vivo experimental studies in rats (analized samples of the ileal, cecal and colonic digesta; pH; blood serum; fecal enzymes); determination of the number of bacteria – fluorescence in situ hybridization; and determination of type and concentration SCFA – HPLC were considered.FindingsNo statistically significant differences in final body weight were found between rats fed low-fat and high-fat diets supplemented with dextrin. In rats fed the low-fat diet with dextrin, the gut microbiota composition was as follows: 42.74 percent Bacteroises and Prevotella (Bacteroidetes), 35.28 percent Clostridium and Lactobacilllus (Firmicutes) and 21.98 percent Bifidobacterium (Actinobacteria), while in rats fed the high-fat diet with dextrin it was similar. Irrespective of the diet type, supplementation with dextrin enhances bacterial glycolytic activity and the cecal production of total SCFAs, with strongly increased propionate and decreased butyrate fermentation.Practical implicationsDextrin may enrich food or be a component of functional foods.Originality/valueDextrin from corn starch may contribute to changes in the composition of intestinal microbiota.

Journal

British Food JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 2, 2019

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