Coordination during multi‐agency emergency response: issues and solutions

Coordination during multi‐agency emergency response: issues and solutions Purpose – Coordination between military and civilian agencies has previously been found to be a significant issue that affects the efficiency of multi‐agency system responses to large‐scale emergencies. The purpose of this article is to present the findings derived from a case study focussing on the problems that abound when the military attempts to work with civilian organisations. Design/methodology/approach – An integrated framework of human factors methods was used to analyse a Military Aid to the Civilian Authorities training exercise, involving the army and seven other responding agencies. Findings – A range of factors that hinder coordination between agencies during multi‐agency emergency responses were identified. Potential solutions for removing these barriers and augmenting coordination levels are proposed. Practical implications – This research suggests that much further work is required in training and designing multi‐agency response systems and procedures in order to optimise coordination between responding agencies. Originality/value – This article presents the first attempt to apply structured, theoretically underpinned human factors methods, to understand the problems that abound when the military works with civilian agencies during large‐scale emergency responses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disaster Prevention and Management Emerald Publishing

Coordination during multi‐agency emergency response: issues and solutions

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/coordination-during-multi-agency-emergency-response-issues-and-qk1n8vxset
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0965-3562
DOI
10.1108/09653561111126085
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Coordination between military and civilian agencies has previously been found to be a significant issue that affects the efficiency of multi‐agency system responses to large‐scale emergencies. The purpose of this article is to present the findings derived from a case study focussing on the problems that abound when the military attempts to work with civilian organisations. Design/methodology/approach – An integrated framework of human factors methods was used to analyse a Military Aid to the Civilian Authorities training exercise, involving the army and seven other responding agencies. Findings – A range of factors that hinder coordination between agencies during multi‐agency emergency responses were identified. Potential solutions for removing these barriers and augmenting coordination levels are proposed. Practical implications – This research suggests that much further work is required in training and designing multi‐agency response systems and procedures in order to optimise coordination between responding agencies. Originality/value – This article presents the first attempt to apply structured, theoretically underpinned human factors methods, to understand the problems that abound when the military works with civilian agencies during large‐scale emergency responses.

Journal

Disaster Prevention and ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 26, 2011

Keywords: Disasters; Emergency services; Government agencies; Armed forces; United Kingdom

References

  • Strategic approach to disaster management: lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina
    Banipal, K.
  • Coordination in emergency response management
    Chen, R.; Sharman, R.; Rao, H.R.; Upadhyaya, S.J.
  • How a cockpit remembers its speeds
    Hutchins, E.
  • Issues in disaster relief: progress, perpetual problems and prospective solutions
    McEntire, D.A.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off