Consumer confusion: reduction strategies in higher education

Consumer confusion: reduction strategies in higher education This paper highlights the increasingly important topic of consumer confusion. Drawing parallels with experiences in the private sector, the concept of consumer confusion is explored within the higher education sector; what causes the phenomenon, how do consumers react to it and how can it be negated/minimised? The expansion and commercialisation of higher education has seen the wide‐scale adoption of marketing techniques within the sector. Such actions generate increased capacity for consumer confusion, with consumers being overwhelmed with information and potentially making sub‐optimum decisions. Given that the selection of a degree course is normally a life changing event, careful consideration needs to be given, by all parties, to whether marketing helps or hinders this process. While focusing on higher education, the issues considered are equally applicable to any public sector body adopting a more market driven approach. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Educational Management Emerald Publishing

Consumer confusion: reduction strategies in higher education

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0951-354X
DOI
10.1108/09513540410543466
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper highlights the increasingly important topic of consumer confusion. Drawing parallels with experiences in the private sector, the concept of consumer confusion is explored within the higher education sector; what causes the phenomenon, how do consumers react to it and how can it be negated/minimised? The expansion and commercialisation of higher education has seen the wide‐scale adoption of marketing techniques within the sector. Such actions generate increased capacity for consumer confusion, with consumers being overwhelmed with information and potentially making sub‐optimum decisions. Given that the selection of a degree course is normally a life changing event, careful consideration needs to be given, by all parties, to whether marketing helps or hinders this process. While focusing on higher education, the issues considered are equally applicable to any public sector body adopting a more market driven approach.

Journal

International Journal of Educational ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 2004

Keywords: Consumers; Consumer behaviour; Higher education

References

  • We sure as hell confused ourselves, but what about the customers?
    Cahill, D.J.

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