Consumer acceptance of functional foods: issues for the future

Consumer acceptance of functional foods: issues for the future In the past, it has been assumed that consumers would accept novel foods if there is a concrete and tangible consumer benefit associated with them, which implies that functional foods would quickly be accepted. However, there is evidence that individuals are likely to differ in the extent to which they are likely to buy products with particular functional properties. Various cross‐cultural and demographic differences in acceptance found in the literature are reviewed, as well as barriers to dietary change. In conclusion, it is argued that understanding consumers’ risk perceptions and concerns associated with processing technologies, emerging scientific innovations and their own health status may enable the development of information strategies that are relevant to wider groups of individuals in the population, and deliver real health benefits to people at risk of, or suffering from, major degenerative illnesses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Food Journal Emerald Publishing

Consumer acceptance of functional foods: issues for the future

British Food Journal, Volume 105 (10): 18 – Nov 1, 2003

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0007-070X
DOI
10.1108/00070700310506263
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the past, it has been assumed that consumers would accept novel foods if there is a concrete and tangible consumer benefit associated with them, which implies that functional foods would quickly be accepted. However, there is evidence that individuals are likely to differ in the extent to which they are likely to buy products with particular functional properties. Various cross‐cultural and demographic differences in acceptance found in the literature are reviewed, as well as barriers to dietary change. In conclusion, it is argued that understanding consumers’ risk perceptions and concerns associated with processing technologies, emerging scientific innovations and their own health status may enable the development of information strategies that are relevant to wider groups of individuals in the population, and deliver real health benefits to people at risk of, or suffering from, major degenerative illnesses.

Journal

British Food JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 2003

Keywords: Food products; Consumer behaviour

References

  • Determinants of consumer attitudes and purchase intentions with regard to genetically modified foods: results of a cross‐national survey
    Bredahl, L.
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    Eiser, R.J.; Miles, S.; Frewer, L.J.
  • Public attitudes, scientific advice and the politics of regulatory policy: the case of BSE
    Frewer, L.J.; Salter, B.
  • What determines trust in information about food‐related risks? Underlying psychological constructs
    Frewer, L.J.; Howard, C.; Hedderley, D.; Shepherd, R.
  • Public opposition to genetic engineering
    Hoban, T.; Woodrum, E.; Czaja, R.
  • Functional foods. Part 2: the impact on current regulatory terminology
    Kwak, N.S.; Jukes, D.J.
  • Poor diet and smoking: the big killers
    Lambert, N.; Dibsdall, L.A.; Frewer, L.J.
  • A causal model explaining the perception and acceptance of gene technology
    Siegrist, M.
  • The influence of trust and perceptions of risks and benefits on the acceptance of gene technology
    Siegrist, M.
  • Public perception of the potential hazards associated with food production and food consumption: an empirical study
    Sparks, P.; Shepherd, R.
  • Changes in perceived vulnerability following natural disaster
    Weinstein, N.D.; Lyon, J.E.; Rothman, A.J.; Cuite, C.L.

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