Conflict and well‐being at work: the moderating role of personality

Conflict and well‐being at work: the moderating role of personality Purpose – This study examines the moderating influence of the Big Five factors of agreeableness, extraversion, and emotional stability on the relationship between conflict and well‐being. Design/methodology/approach – Two field studies were conducted in which respondents were asked to fill out questionnaires during work hours; the first study involved a health care organization, the second one a manufacturing organization. Findings – In performing sets of hierarchical regressions it was shown that conflict was negatively associated with well‐being, especially when individuals were low in agreeableness, low in emotional stability or low in extraversion. Research limitations/implications – We proposed directional relations between conflict and individual well‐being, however we cannot rule out the alternative in which reduced well‐being leads to more conflict. Future research using a cross‐lagged design with longitudinal data is needed to establish causal relationships. Practical implications – The most straightforward implication for practice seems to be that conflict should become part of the checklist consultant's use when advising organisations with high rates of turnover, sick leave, and absenteeism. Originality/value – This study showed that conflict adversely affects well‐being, especially for disagreeable, emotional unstable, or introverted individuals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Managerial Psychology Emerald Publishing

Conflict and well‐being at work: the moderating role of personality

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0268-3946
D.O.I.
10.1108/02683940510579740
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This study examines the moderating influence of the Big Five factors of agreeableness, extraversion, and emotional stability on the relationship between conflict and well‐being. Design/methodology/approach – Two field studies were conducted in which respondents were asked to fill out questionnaires during work hours; the first study involved a health care organization, the second one a manufacturing organization. Findings – In performing sets of hierarchical regressions it was shown that conflict was negatively associated with well‐being, especially when individuals were low in agreeableness, low in emotional stability or low in extraversion. Research limitations/implications – We proposed directional relations between conflict and individual well‐being, however we cannot rule out the alternative in which reduced well‐being leads to more conflict. Future research using a cross‐lagged design with longitudinal data is needed to establish causal relationships. Practical implications – The most straightforward implication for practice seems to be that conflict should become part of the checklist consultant's use when advising organisations with high rates of turnover, sick leave, and absenteeism. Originality/value – This study showed that conflict adversely affects well‐being, especially for disagreeable, emotional unstable, or introverted individuals.

Journal

Journal of Managerial PsychologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 2005

Keywords: Conflict; Personality; Personal needs; Career satisfaction

References

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    Barrick, M.R.; Mount, M.K.
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    Beersma, B.; De Dreu, C.K.W.
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    Brondolo, E.; Masheb, R.; Stores, J.; Stockhammer, T.; Tunick, W.; Melhado, E.
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    Van Dierendonck, D.; Schaufeli, W.B.; Sixma, H.J.

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