Conductive polymer-carbon black composites-based sensor arrays for use in an electronic nose

Conductive polymer-carbon black composites-based sensor arrays for use in an electronic nose Polymer‐carbon black composites are a new class of chemical detecting sensors used in electronic noses. These composites are prepared by mixing carbon black and polymer in an appropriate solvent. The mixture is deposited on a substrate between two metal electrodes, whereby the solvent evaporates leaving a composite film. Arrays of these chemiresistors, made from a chemically diverse number of polymers and carbon black, swell reversibly, inducing a resistance change on exposure to chemical vapors. These arrays generate a pattern that is a unique fingerprint for the vapor being detected. With the aid of algorithms these patterns are processed and recognized. These arrays can detect and discriminate between a large number of chemical vapors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sensor Review Emerald Publishing

Conductive polymer-carbon black composites-based sensor arrays for use in an electronic nose

Sensor Review, Volume 19 (4): 6 – Dec 1, 1999

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0260-2288
DOI
10.1108/02602289910294745
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Polymer‐carbon black composites are a new class of chemical detecting sensors used in electronic noses. These composites are prepared by mixing carbon black and polymer in an appropriate solvent. The mixture is deposited on a substrate between two metal electrodes, whereby the solvent evaporates leaving a composite film. Arrays of these chemiresistors, made from a chemically diverse number of polymers and carbon black, swell reversibly, inducing a resistance change on exposure to chemical vapors. These arrays generate a pattern that is a unique fingerprint for the vapor being detected. With the aid of algorithms these patterns are processed and recognized. These arrays can detect and discriminate between a large number of chemical vapors.

Journal

Sensor ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1999

Keywords: Gas sensors

References

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