Computing electrical potential in unbounded twodimensional regions

Computing electrical potential in unbounded twodimensional regions Finite difference and finite element methods have serious limitations when applied to unbounded regions. This paper describes a hybrid method which uses a conformal transformation to map the original boundaries, including those at infinity, to a bounded region and only then applies a numerical method based on finite differences or finite elements when no direct solution is obvious. Testing this approach by means of examples for which exact solutions are obtainable, the hybrid method is applied to determine the electrical potential at specific points in the field of a capacitor with long plates that in their crosssectional view are parallel to each other, and in the field of a microstrip line at some distance from it. In both the cases, the results are in agreement with analytically derived results. The method is simple, readily applied by undergraduate students, yet accurate and thus of use in professional engineering work as well. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Microelectronics International Emerald Publishing

Computing electrical potential in unbounded twodimensional regions

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1356-5362
DOI
10.1108/13565360310472167
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Finite difference and finite element methods have serious limitations when applied to unbounded regions. This paper describes a hybrid method which uses a conformal transformation to map the original boundaries, including those at infinity, to a bounded region and only then applies a numerical method based on finite differences or finite elements when no direct solution is obvious. Testing this approach by means of examples for which exact solutions are obtainable, the hybrid method is applied to determine the electrical potential at specific points in the field of a capacitor with long plates that in their crosssectional view are parallel to each other, and in the field of a microstrip line at some distance from it. In both the cases, the results are in agreement with analytically derived results. The method is simple, readily applied by undergraduate students, yet accurate and thus of use in professional engineering work as well.

Journal

Microelectronics InternationalEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 2003

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