Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Competencen in home care

Competencen in home care More and more people are receiving care while living in their own homes, a far greater number than are in residential and nursing home care, and in some cases with more complex needs. Yet there persists an image of home care as a very basic activity needing little or no training and in volving no career pr ogression. This image will have to change radically if registered providers are to meet the new national regulatory standards and if there is to be sufficient staff recruitment to meet the ever increasing demand for home care. This article sets out ways in which provider or ganisations can respond to these changes, particularly by building staff development and training strategies. Such strategies must recognise the growing importance and complexity of home care and take special account of the need for staff to gain vocational qualifications. Home care must be seen as offering professional career opportunities, not just a job. The article concludes that the future will lie in bringing care to the people who need it, rather than bringing people to the care. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Emerald Publishing

Competencen in home care

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults , Volume 2 (2): 8 – Jun 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/competencen-in-home-care-vX97oVdRtK
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1471-7794
DOI
10.1108/14717794200100013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

More and more people are receiving care while living in their own homes, a far greater number than are in residential and nursing home care, and in some cases with more complex needs. Yet there persists an image of home care as a very basic activity needing little or no training and in volving no career pr ogression. This image will have to change radically if registered providers are to meet the new national regulatory standards and if there is to be sufficient staff recruitment to meet the ever increasing demand for home care. This article sets out ways in which provider or ganisations can respond to these changes, particularly by building staff development and training strategies. Such strategies must recognise the growing importance and complexity of home care and take special account of the need for staff to gain vocational qualifications. Home care must be seen as offering professional career opportunities, not just a job. The article concludes that the future will lie in bringing care to the people who need it, rather than bringing people to the care.

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.