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COMPATIBILITY OF SYNTHETIC AERO ENGINE LUBRICANTS

COMPATIBILITY OF SYNTHETIC AERO ENGINE LUBRICANTS The authors stated that, in general, their experience with synthetic lubricants ranged from satisfactory COMPATIBILIT Y OF to marginal. Much of their good experience was directly attributed to careful design of the lubricating system and by elimination of non-compatible mat­ SYNTHETIC AERO erials. Supplementary cooling and adequate shielding from hot engine sections were important. Their experience indicated that they could use better ENGINE LUBRICANTS lubricants now, and will definately need better oils in the future. Experience with materials in contact with synthetic oil was varied and, at times, extremely frustrating. TH E United States Air Force has been using syn- At elevated temperatures these oils are not compatible thetic gas turbine lubricants for the past four with elastomers. In this respect, a paper presented years. Higher performance engines made previously to the American Chemical Society, in May, by used mineral oils unsatisfactory because of their high Mueller and Clark of the Battelle Institute describes coking tendencies, high evaporation loss at elevated their work on hot-lubricant-resisting rubber. Their temperatures, and their lack of load-carrying ability research included a study of mixtures of varying types to lubricate turboprop engine reduction gear. In and amounts of acrylate polymer, vulcanizing agents December 195l, the U.S. Air Force issued specification fillers, lubricants and antioxidents. The most pro­ MIL-L-7108, establishing the requirements for a mising results were obtained with a copolymer of synthetic based lubricant. This specification was ethyl acrylate and chloroethylvinyl ether. The best written around an Esso Standard Oil Company hot oil aged properties were found in a curing system formulation WS-2211, now marketed as Esso Turbo consisting of a careful balance of triethylene tetra- Oil 15. A paper presented to the SAE Golden mine, sulphur, and tetramethyl thiuram disulphide. Anniversary Aeronautic Meeting in New York in The best performing reinforcing filler was a calcium April, by Davidson, Cooley and Way, of the Power silicate pigment, Silene EF . As developed, the final Plant Laboratory Wright Air Development Centre, product met all the minimum target requirements, Air Research and Development Command, U.S.A.F., except that the swell, after the 500-hr. immersion has detailed the Air Force's experience with these test at 350°F. was 6 per cent above the 30 per cent lubricants. maximum required. 3 8 Scientific LUBRICATION July, 1955 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Emerald Publishing

COMPATIBILITY OF SYNTHETIC AERO ENGINE LUBRICANTS

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology , Volume 7 (7): 1 – Jul 1, 1955

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0036-8792
DOI
10.1108/eb052351
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The authors stated that, in general, their experience with synthetic lubricants ranged from satisfactory COMPATIBILIT Y OF to marginal. Much of their good experience was directly attributed to careful design of the lubricating system and by elimination of non-compatible mat­ SYNTHETIC AERO erials. Supplementary cooling and adequate shielding from hot engine sections were important. Their experience indicated that they could use better ENGINE LUBRICANTS lubricants now, and will definately need better oils in the future. Experience with materials in contact with synthetic oil was varied and, at times, extremely frustrating. TH E United States Air Force has been using syn- At elevated temperatures these oils are not compatible thetic gas turbine lubricants for the past four with elastomers. In this respect, a paper presented years. Higher performance engines made previously to the American Chemical Society, in May, by used mineral oils unsatisfactory because of their high Mueller and Clark of the Battelle Institute describes coking tendencies, high evaporation loss at elevated their work on hot-lubricant-resisting rubber. Their temperatures, and their lack of load-carrying ability research included a study of mixtures of varying types to lubricate turboprop engine reduction gear. In and amounts of acrylate polymer, vulcanizing agents December 195l, the U.S. Air Force issued specification fillers, lubricants and antioxidents. The most pro­ MIL-L-7108, establishing the requirements for a mising results were obtained with a copolymer of synthetic based lubricant. This specification was ethyl acrylate and chloroethylvinyl ether. The best written around an Esso Standard Oil Company hot oil aged properties were found in a curing system formulation WS-2211, now marketed as Esso Turbo consisting of a careful balance of triethylene tetra- Oil 15. A paper presented to the SAE Golden mine, sulphur, and tetramethyl thiuram disulphide. Anniversary Aeronautic Meeting in New York in The best performing reinforcing filler was a calcium April, by Davidson, Cooley and Way, of the Power silicate pigment, Silene EF . As developed, the final Plant Laboratory Wright Air Development Centre, product met all the minimum target requirements, Air Research and Development Command, U.S.A.F., except that the swell, after the 500-hr. immersion has detailed the Air Force's experience with these test at 350°F. was 6 per cent above the 30 per cent lubricants. maximum required. 3 8 Scientific LUBRICATION July, 1955

Journal

Industrial Lubrication and TribologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 1955

There are no references for this article.