Communication managers in the dominant coalition Power attributes and communication practices

Communication managers in the dominant coalition Power attributes and communication practices Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine formal and informal types of power, and identify the characteristics of corporate communications managers who are in the dominant coalition. Design/methodology/approach – The paper reports on results of a survey sent to a representative sample of S&P 500 corporate communications managers and CEOs in the USA Data about industry sector, company size, annual revenue and profitability were collected for the responding companies and a random sample of 100 non‐responding companies. The responding companies ( n =161) did not significantly differ from the non‐responding companies Findings – The paper finds that four attributes of informal power differentiate communications managers who are in the dominant coalition from those who are not: reciprocal trust, strategic business decision‐making, social inclusion and communication expertise. Research limitations/implications – Future research should explore whether any of the 37 percent of communications managers in the dominant coalition at these top companies come from backgrounds significantly different from those of the executive elite. Practical implications – The paper supports the organizational theory of the importance of informal power as a prerequisite to be in the dominant coalition – particularly friendship and “being included.” Communications managers who are in the dominant coalition are in a better position to institute ethical and excellent (symmetrical) communication practices. The findings of this study have implications for the likely success (or lack thereof) of managers with diverse backgrounds of being included in the dominant coalition. Originality/value – The paper provides quantitative, generalizable results based on a representative sample where many previous studies have relied on qualitative data alone. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Communication Management Emerald Publishing

Communication managers in the dominant coalition Power attributes and communication practices

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1363-254X
DOI
10.1108/13632541311318747
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine formal and informal types of power, and identify the characteristics of corporate communications managers who are in the dominant coalition. Design/methodology/approach – The paper reports on results of a survey sent to a representative sample of S&P 500 corporate communications managers and CEOs in the USA Data about industry sector, company size, annual revenue and profitability were collected for the responding companies and a random sample of 100 non‐responding companies. The responding companies ( n =161) did not significantly differ from the non‐responding companies Findings – The paper finds that four attributes of informal power differentiate communications managers who are in the dominant coalition from those who are not: reciprocal trust, strategic business decision‐making, social inclusion and communication expertise. Research limitations/implications – Future research should explore whether any of the 37 percent of communications managers in the dominant coalition at these top companies come from backgrounds significantly different from those of the executive elite. Practical implications – The paper supports the organizational theory of the importance of informal power as a prerequisite to be in the dominant coalition – particularly friendship and “being included.” Communications managers who are in the dominant coalition are in a better position to institute ethical and excellent (symmetrical) communication practices. The findings of this study have implications for the likely success (or lack thereof) of managers with diverse backgrounds of being included in the dominant coalition. Originality/value – The paper provides quantitative, generalizable results based on a representative sample where many previous studies have relied on qualitative data alone.

Journal

Journal of Communication ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: May 3, 2013

Keywords: Communication management; Corporate communications; Organizational culture; Public relations; Dominant coalition; Power

References

  • Communication management as a second‐order management function: roles and functions of the communication executive – results from a shadowing study
    Nothhaft, H.
  • Conflict, strategic management, and public relations
    Plowman, K.D.
  • Finding influence: examining the role of influence in public relations practice
    Reber, B.H.; Berger, B.K.

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