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Communicating in family aged care dyads Part 1: The influence of stereotypical role expectations

Communicating in family aged care dyads Part 1: The influence of stereotypical role expectations This paper contends that dysfunctional patterns of communication can develop in family aged care dyads in response to stereotypical role expectations in the caregiving‐carereceiving relationship, thus giving rise to a role predicament of caring. If this argument holds it follows that more productive and effective forms of communication and relationship are dependent upon both members of the aged care dyad understanding the expectations of their role and if necessary reconstructing them. Part 1 of this two part conceptual paper develops the Communication Predicament of Ageing Model to include role expectations. The conceptions are grounded in important conclusions drawn from data contained in a large comprehensive study of older people and their family caregivers. Part 2 of the paper (to be published in the next issue of Quality in Ageing) introduces the health promoting communication model which was developed as a framework for guiding both prevention and intervention strategies to prevent or transform a role predicament of caring. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Emerald Publishing

Communicating in family aged care dyads Part 1: The influence of stereotypical role expectations

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1471-7794
DOI
10.1108/14717794200400008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper contends that dysfunctional patterns of communication can develop in family aged care dyads in response to stereotypical role expectations in the caregiving‐carereceiving relationship, thus giving rise to a role predicament of caring. If this argument holds it follows that more productive and effective forms of communication and relationship are dependent upon both members of the aged care dyad understanding the expectations of their role and if necessary reconstructing them. Part 1 of this two part conceptual paper develops the Communication Predicament of Ageing Model to include role expectations. The conceptions are grounded in important conclusions drawn from data contained in a large comprehensive study of older people and their family caregivers. Part 2 of the paper (to be published in the next issue of Quality in Ageing) introduces the health promoting communication model which was developed as a framework for guiding both prevention and intervention strategies to prevent or transform a role predicament of caring.

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 2004

Keywords: Older people; Family; Caregiving; Carereceiving; Communication; Role expectations

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