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COMMERCIAL AIR ORGANIZATION

COMMERCIAL AIR ORGANIZATION February, 1943 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 31 us all with their cloak again. But viewed in conjunction with the serious, almost desperate, position of British commercial aviation for the post-war world, with which we dealt fully last month, they take on an entirely new importance and significance. Debarred almost entirely, as we are, by the turn of events in wartime, from obtaining practical experience in the operation and maintenance of air lines over the world's air routes something may be saved from the wreckage by a considered study and examination of the under­ lying principles of organization that will have to be brought into being when peace comes. Such a course of study as tha t contained in these articles should save much time in groping and experimenta­ tion when the time for action arrives. Operational Experience As we endeavoured to make clear last month, it is the operational N this issue we complete the publication of a series of articles on experience that is being obtained by the American companies and the organization of the equipment and maintenance of a n air-line Army Air Transport Command that will give them such an over­ which, with one intermission, has been appearing in these columns whelming lead over England after the war. This is, actually, of far since July last year. The event has sent us back to a reperusal of a more importance even than the possession of up-to-date designs more serious and attentive nature than has been possible in the of cargo and passenger carrying aeroplanes. It is for this reason turmoil of monthly preparation for the press ; when more attention that we believe that such reasoned examinations of the principles is perforce paid to the correct placing of commas and the avoidance of organization as that contained in these articles by MR. LUSTY of misprints than to the general sense of the text. Indeed, we may prove of inestimable value. There is, for instance, reason to are ashamed to say that we have given the articles a more careful have confidence that the newly produced British transport aero­ reading even than we did when we originally accepted them for plane, the York, developed, in almost re-designed form, by Messrs. publication, when hardly more than a cursory examination was A. V. RO E from the Lancaster bomber, will prove to be at least the needed to show their originality and interest. equal in performance and other respects of the latest American "transports" . The design of the machine is, comparatively speak­ ing, the easiest part of the problem ; it is the knowledge of all th e An Important Series multifarious difficulties that are encountered and overcome in operation in many parts of the world in different weather and Those who know MR. LUSTY are familiar with his experience and ground conditions that is so difficult to envisage and provide for qualifications to deal with this subject, while those who are not so except in the light of actual experience. Lack of this experience favoured will have found ample evidence in the matter of the can only be made up for, to as great an extent as possible, by a study articles themselves. In our opinion, they are quite outstanding of the organization needed to take advantage of, and pu t into use, and, so far as our knowledge goes, unique in covering aspects of th e the lessons of th e experience with the minimum of delay after it is management of an air transport organization which have not been obtained, and it is here that we feel that MR. LUSTY has done in ­ dealt with in print before. We feel very strongly that they are de­ valuable spade work. serving of preservation in a more permanent guise than mere ephemeral publication in an engineering monthly, and we very much hope that he will be able to make arrangements for their re-issue in book form. The variety and range of subjects gone into are extra ­ Advisory Bodies ordinarily wide, and we cannot imagine anyone who has been, is, or Since we wrote last month two developments have been an­ hopes to be connected with the running of British commercial air nounced which tend to show that something is moving in regard to lines who would not derive benefit and inspiration from a study of British commercial aviation after the war. The Government has them. The whole series has been most intelligently planned and announced the setting up of a small technical departmental Com­ carefully divided into sections which lead on consecutively from mittee under the chairmanship of LORD BRABAZON OF TARA "t o one to another, so that by the end practically the whole field of inquire and advise them in regard to the development of aeroplanes management, and not only on the engineering side, is surveyed. for civil aviation, and to report as soon as possible". This Com­ Some of it is actually of considerably wider application than the mittee has, in fact, already reported, but most of its findings are mere organization of an air line. Section III , for example, published to be kept secret. It has also been stated in the press that a joint in our issue for last October, on "General Economic Considera­ committee of the London Chamber of Commerce (which already has tions", might well be studied by anyone charged with the lay-out a Civil Aviation Committee), the Association of British Chambers of and running of any small—or, for tha t matter, large, particularly Commerce and the Federation of British Industries, under the if of an expanding character—factory engaged in the production of chairmanship of MR. OLIVER SIMMONDS, M.P., is to consider civil engineering components. Based on experience with an engine post-war air developments. In addition to these, there is, we believe test department the whole question of size and "load " of a pro­ another unofficial committee formed, under whose aegis we do not ductive unit in relation to cost and efficiency is examined in a know, comprising interested aviation personalities, which is con­ most succinct and lucid manner, with the minimum of "cackle" sidering the matter in a wide aspect. LORD BRABAZON'S committee, and accompanied by admirable explanatory diagrams; a study of in our view, is, for reasons we have indicated above, too limited in which might well bring case to the fevered brow of many a harassed its terms to be of the full value that it might have been, and there production manager. seems to be a need for a strong co-ordinating committee more on th e lines of the Government Civil Aerial Transport Committee of 1919. A committee on somewhat similar lines might save the situation if its A Topical Significance recommendations were sufficiently clear and unequivocal. We readily admit that the scries has an interest and topicality The carefully non-committal reply of the Government spokesman which we have only now, in retrospect, realized, and which we almost to a debate on the subject initiated by LORD LONDONDERRY (who entirely failed to appreciate when we originally decided on publica­ is to raise the matter again on March 10) in the HOUSE OF LORDS tion. They at tha t time seemed to contain an interest which was t o on February 10, shows that the Government have no intention a large extent academic until the piping times of peace enveloped of doing anything until they are forced into it. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

COMMERCIAL AIR ORGANIZATION

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 15 (2): 1 – Feb 1, 1943

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030986
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

February, 1943 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G 31 us all with their cloak again. But viewed in conjunction with the serious, almost desperate, position of British commercial aviation for the post-war world, with which we dealt fully last month, they take on an entirely new importance and significance. Debarred almost entirely, as we are, by the turn of events in wartime, from obtaining practical experience in the operation and maintenance of air lines over the world's air routes something may be saved from the wreckage by a considered study and examination of the under­ lying principles of organization that will have to be brought into being when peace comes. Such a course of study as tha t contained in these articles should save much time in groping and experimenta­ tion when the time for action arrives. Operational Experience As we endeavoured to make clear last month, it is the operational N this issue we complete the publication of a series of articles on experience that is being obtained by the American companies and the organization of the equipment and maintenance of a n air-line Army Air Transport Command that will give them such an over­ which, with one intermission, has been appearing in these columns whelming lead over England after the war. This is, actually, of far since July last year. The event has sent us back to a reperusal of a more importance even than the possession of up-to-date designs more serious and attentive nature than has been possible in the of cargo and passenger carrying aeroplanes. It is for this reason turmoil of monthly preparation for the press ; when more attention that we believe that such reasoned examinations of the principles is perforce paid to the correct placing of commas and the avoidance of organization as that contained in these articles by MR. LUSTY of misprints than to the general sense of the text. Indeed, we may prove of inestimable value. There is, for instance, reason to are ashamed to say that we have given the articles a more careful have confidence that the newly produced British transport aero­ reading even than we did when we originally accepted them for plane, the York, developed, in almost re-designed form, by Messrs. publication, when hardly more than a cursory examination was A. V. RO E from the Lancaster bomber, will prove to be at least the needed to show their originality and interest. equal in performance and other respects of the latest American "transports" . The design of the machine is, comparatively speak­ ing, the easiest part of the problem ; it is the knowledge of all th e An Important Series multifarious difficulties that are encountered and overcome in operation in many parts of the world in different weather and Those who know MR. LUSTY are familiar with his experience and ground conditions that is so difficult to envisage and provide for qualifications to deal with this subject, while those who are not so except in the light of actual experience. Lack of this experience favoured will have found ample evidence in the matter of the can only be made up for, to as great an extent as possible, by a study articles themselves. In our opinion, they are quite outstanding of the organization needed to take advantage of, and pu t into use, and, so far as our knowledge goes, unique in covering aspects of th e the lessons of th e experience with the minimum of delay after it is management of an air transport organization which have not been obtained, and it is here that we feel that MR. LUSTY has done in ­ dealt with in print before. We feel very strongly that they are de­ valuable spade work. serving of preservation in a more permanent guise than mere ephemeral publication in an engineering monthly, and we very much hope that he will be able to make arrangements for their re-issue in book form. The variety and range of subjects gone into are extra ­ Advisory Bodies ordinarily wide, and we cannot imagine anyone who has been, is, or Since we wrote last month two developments have been an­ hopes to be connected with the running of British commercial air nounced which tend to show that something is moving in regard to lines who would not derive benefit and inspiration from a study of British commercial aviation after the war. The Government has them. The whole series has been most intelligently planned and announced the setting up of a small technical departmental Com­ carefully divided into sections which lead on consecutively from mittee under the chairmanship of LORD BRABAZON OF TARA "t o one to another, so that by the end practically the whole field of inquire and advise them in regard to the development of aeroplanes management, and not only on the engineering side, is surveyed. for civil aviation, and to report as soon as possible". This Com­ Some of it is actually of considerably wider application than the mittee has, in fact, already reported, but most of its findings are mere organization of an air line. Section III , for example, published to be kept secret. It has also been stated in the press that a joint in our issue for last October, on "General Economic Considera­ committee of the London Chamber of Commerce (which already has tions", might well be studied by anyone charged with the lay-out a Civil Aviation Committee), the Association of British Chambers of and running of any small—or, for tha t matter, large, particularly Commerce and the Federation of British Industries, under the if of an expanding character—factory engaged in the production of chairmanship of MR. OLIVER SIMMONDS, M.P., is to consider civil engineering components. Based on experience with an engine post-war air developments. In addition to these, there is, we believe test department the whole question of size and "load " of a pro­ another unofficial committee formed, under whose aegis we do not ductive unit in relation to cost and efficiency is examined in a know, comprising interested aviation personalities, which is con­ most succinct and lucid manner, with the minimum of "cackle" sidering the matter in a wide aspect. LORD BRABAZON'S committee, and accompanied by admirable explanatory diagrams; a study of in our view, is, for reasons we have indicated above, too limited in which might well bring case to the fevered brow of many a harassed its terms to be of the full value that it might have been, and there production manager. seems to be a need for a strong co-ordinating committee more on th e lines of the Government Civil Aerial Transport Committee of 1919. A committee on somewhat similar lines might save the situation if its A Topical Significance recommendations were sufficiently clear and unequivocal. We readily admit that the scries has an interest and topicality The carefully non-committal reply of the Government spokesman which we have only now, in retrospect, realized, and which we almost to a debate on the subject initiated by LORD LONDONDERRY (who entirely failed to appreciate when we originally decided on publica­ is to raise the matter again on March 10) in the HOUSE OF LORDS tion. They at tha t time seemed to contain an interest which was t o on February 10, shows that the Government have no intention a large extent academic until the piping times of peace enveloped of doing anything until they are forced into it.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1943

There are no references for this article.