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Commentary - Systems thinking and educational leadership: implications of the special issue to school improvement in development contexts

Commentary - Systems thinking and educational leadership: implications of the special issue to... JEA Commentary - Systems thinking 59,1 and educational leadership: implications of the special issue to school improvement in development contexts School improvement is a wicked problem. It is even more wicked in developing countries. According to the UNESCO (2020) Global Education Monitoring Report, 258 million children and youth are excluded from education, poor rural young women particularly in sub-Saharan Africa will not access universal upper-secondary education by 2030, too many children cannot go to school or are the most susceptible to drop out due to poverty, gender, age, rural status, indigeneity, disability, caste and ethnicity, health and nutrition status, language, religion, beliefs and attitudes, sexual orientation or gender identity expression, incarceration and migration or displacement status. UNESCO recommends that inclusive education should be extended to all learners, financing should be targeted to those left behind, expertise and resources should be apportioned and mobilized to reach all students, communities should be involved and meaningfully consulted, national education programs should be jointly delivered across government agencies, nongovernment actors should be involved in promoting inclusion, and teachers should be prepared to teach all students. In the Middle East and North Africa, the World Bank (El-Kogali and Krafft, 2019) reports four tensions holding http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Educational Administration Emerald Publishing

Commentary - Systems thinking and educational leadership: implications of the special issue to school improvement in development contexts

Journal of Educational Administration , Volume 59 (1): 6 – Feb 4, 2021

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
0957-8234
DOI
10.1108/jea-02-2021-249
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JEA Commentary - Systems thinking 59,1 and educational leadership: implications of the special issue to school improvement in development contexts School improvement is a wicked problem. It is even more wicked in developing countries. According to the UNESCO (2020) Global Education Monitoring Report, 258 million children and youth are excluded from education, poor rural young women particularly in sub-Saharan Africa will not access universal upper-secondary education by 2030, too many children cannot go to school or are the most susceptible to drop out due to poverty, gender, age, rural status, indigeneity, disability, caste and ethnicity, health and nutrition status, language, religion, beliefs and attitudes, sexual orientation or gender identity expression, incarceration and migration or displacement status. UNESCO recommends that inclusive education should be extended to all learners, financing should be targeted to those left behind, expertise and resources should be apportioned and mobilized to reach all students, communities should be involved and meaningfully consulted, national education programs should be jointly delivered across government agencies, nongovernment actors should be involved in promoting inclusion, and teachers should be prepared to teach all students. In the Middle East and North Africa, the World Bank (El-Kogali and Krafft, 2019) reports four tensions holding

Journal

Journal of Educational AdministrationEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 4, 2021

References