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Comment December 1990 PIGMENT AND RESIN TECHNOLOGY High oil prices give problems for paint manufacturers The Paintmakers Association of Great Britain has stated that continuing high oil prices are creating problems for paint manufacturers. Earlier reduction in petrol prices were quickly followed by further rises, yet levels remain around 60% higher than pre-Gulf Crisis July prices. Short-term reductions are not reflected down through the chain of oil-derived products and many paint manufacturers who experienced recent increases in raw material prices are now facing further increases. Mrs Moira McMillan, Director of the Paintmakers Association said: "Following an earlier doubling of the price of white spirit and rises of around 75% or more for other commonly used solvents, the industry is now seeing the effect of earlier oil price rises working through the manufacturing chain to resin solutions, resins and other raw materials. "There is a considerable time lag effect and manufacturers using oil-derived products wil l be having to cope for some time to come with the problems caused by three to four months of very high costs". The future market for pigments and extenders Much of the available information regarding the use of pigments in Western Europe is concerned with the technical features of the available products and the latest material developments. The extent of the demand of each type of pigment has only been quantified to a limited extent and those estimates that are available often differ widely between the various sources. The latest study compiled by Information Research Ltd in their series of industry reports aims to provide a balanced overview of the pigment market. The report provides a concise review of the functions and classification of pigments which can most conveniently be divided into four major categories, each wit h its ow n specific characteristic. Of these, the primary white pigments account for around one million tons, titanium dioxide being the most important. The usage of coloured pigments is, of course, considerably less with some 544,000 tons of inorganic and 48,000 tons of organic compounds being used annually at present. However, in quantity terms the various extender pigments based on minerals are the most important, almost five million tons of these products being utilised in Increasingly stringent legislation will preclude the use of certain suspect pigments in the future, with a corresponding increased requirement for acceptable alternatives. This, together with various other factors, will alter the spectrum of pigment types used in Western Europe over the next decade. The report quantifies the market by type of pigment up to 2000, the overall demand being expected to grow by around 40% over this period. This report also quantifies the present and future of the different types of pigments in terms of the major national markets and end-use sectors. The latter comprise paints, inks, plastics and paper, together wit h a plathora of miscellaneous other uses. The structure of the industry is reviewed and a comprehensive listing given of over 100 producers, together with their locations and product lines. The more significant trends in the usage of pigments are identified, together with the likely impact on the market. Guidelines on how to exploit perceived market niches to maximum effect are also provided. The comprehensive report, comprising 126 pages (with 66 tables) is available at a cost of £1,200.00 from Information Research Ltd, 262 Regent Street, London. W1R 5DA. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pigment & Resin Technology Emerald Publishing

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Pigment & Resin Technology , Volume 19 (12): 1 – Dec 1, 1990

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0369-9420
DOI
10.1108/eb042791
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

December 1990 PIGMENT AND RESIN TECHNOLOGY High oil prices give problems for paint manufacturers The Paintmakers Association of Great Britain has stated that continuing high oil prices are creating problems for paint manufacturers. Earlier reduction in petrol prices were quickly followed by further rises, yet levels remain around 60% higher than pre-Gulf Crisis July prices. Short-term reductions are not reflected down through the chain of oil-derived products and many paint manufacturers who experienced recent increases in raw material prices are now facing further increases. Mrs Moira McMillan, Director of the Paintmakers Association said: "Following an earlier doubling of the price of white spirit and rises of around 75% or more for other commonly used solvents, the industry is now seeing the effect of earlier oil price rises working through the manufacturing chain to resin solutions, resins and other raw materials. "There is a considerable time lag effect and manufacturers using oil-derived products wil l be having to cope for some time to come with the problems caused by three to four months of very high costs". The future market for pigments and extenders Much of the available information regarding the use of pigments in Western Europe is concerned with the technical features of the available products and the latest material developments. The extent of the demand of each type of pigment has only been quantified to a limited extent and those estimates that are available often differ widely between the various sources. The latest study compiled by Information Research Ltd in their series of industry reports aims to provide a balanced overview of the pigment market. The report provides a concise review of the functions and classification of pigments which can most conveniently be divided into four major categories, each wit h its ow n specific characteristic. Of these, the primary white pigments account for around one million tons, titanium dioxide being the most important. The usage of coloured pigments is, of course, considerably less with some 544,000 tons of inorganic and 48,000 tons of organic compounds being used annually at present. However, in quantity terms the various extender pigments based on minerals are the most important, almost five million tons of these products being utilised in Increasingly stringent legislation will preclude the use of certain suspect pigments in the future, with a corresponding increased requirement for acceptable alternatives. This, together with various other factors, will alter the spectrum of pigment types used in Western Europe over the next decade. The report quantifies the market by type of pigment up to 2000, the overall demand being expected to grow by around 40% over this period. This report also quantifies the present and future of the different types of pigments in terms of the major national markets and end-use sectors. The latter comprise paints, inks, plastics and paper, together wit h a plathora of miscellaneous other uses. The structure of the industry is reviewed and a comprehensive listing given of over 100 producers, together with their locations and product lines. The more significant trends in the usage of pigments are identified, together with the likely impact on the market. Guidelines on how to exploit perceived market niches to maximum effect are also provided. The comprehensive report, comprising 126 pages (with 66 tables) is available at a cost of £1,200.00 from Information Research Ltd, 262 Regent Street, London. W1R 5DA.

Journal

Pigment & Resin TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1990

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