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Comment July 1991 PIGMENT AND RESIN TECHNOLOGY 3 The future for paint additives Despite the low growth rates expected in the paint and coatings industry over the next five years, paint additive suppliers are facing a challenging time. As environmental pressures force the paint industry to investigate the possibilities of more environmentally friendly and less toxic paint formulations, new and improved additives for water-based, high solid and powder coatings will be sought. Overall the market for paint additives in Western Europe is forecast to increase at an average annual rate of between 3% and 4%, a few percent higher than the expected growth in the paint industry. Significant growth is anticipated in such products as water-based thickeners, in-can preservatives, defoamers and dispersants as demand for these types of products, suitable for water-based coatings, increases. Such products as driers used in solvent-based paints are expected to show only limited growth. Specially additives such as light stabilizers are expected to display exceptional growth. Opportunities exist for both established suppliers of paint additives and companies wishing to increase their presence or even enter this market for the first time. Kline S.A.'s new multiclient study "Paint Additives — Business Opportunities in Western Europe" is a comprehensive analysis of the size, structure, and culture of the paint additive business in Western Europe. Organised in two sections, the study firstly gives an overview of the business, including consumption of major paint additives in 1990 a discussion of trends in the industry an an appraisal of the key requirements for success. The second section describes the paint additives activities of a selection of successful companies serving this business. * * * Integrated paint tinting systems A new indepth multiclient survey to investigate the salient features and future potential for tinting systems for paints over the next decade has recently been initiated by Information Research Ltd (071-287 9322). The latest tinting systems essentially involve the use of a few base paints which are mixed wit h concentrated colorants designed to produce a wide range of qualities. Such tinting systems offer considerable advantage both for in-plant manufacture of coloured paints and also for in-can tinting at point-of-sale. In the case of in-plant tinting, small batches of the required colour can be economically produced in a short time from one or two base paints of each quality. The components of the system have to be matched and controlled for colour, hue and strength, and repeat batches can then easily be made without the need for excessive control of colour. There are advantages also for the use of tinting systems for the in-can production of paints of a specific colour, not only at trade and retail points-of-sale, but also in the paint factory. Only the base paint need be stocked and the minimum batch size is that of the smallest can. Hence an almost unlimited range of colours can be produced economically in very small quantities in a short time. The effects of the steadily increasing demand for colours, together with frequent fashion changes, are resulting in wider appreciation of the advantages of integrated tinting systems throughout Europe. However, the acceptance and use of tinting systems is complicated and depends on a number of factors, the importance of which can vary widely between different geographical regions. For example, they are increasingly important for industrial paints where customers expect rapid service to meet their "just-in- time" inventory requirements. They also have considerable advantages in more sparsely populated locations where deliveries of paint to sales outlets may be relatively infrequent. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pigment & Resin Technology Emerald Publishing

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Pigment & Resin Technology , Volume 20 (7): 1 – Jul 1, 1991

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0369-9420
DOI
10.1108/eb042849
Publisher site
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Abstract

July 1991 PIGMENT AND RESIN TECHNOLOGY 3 The future for paint additives Despite the low growth rates expected in the paint and coatings industry over the next five years, paint additive suppliers are facing a challenging time. As environmental pressures force the paint industry to investigate the possibilities of more environmentally friendly and less toxic paint formulations, new and improved additives for water-based, high solid and powder coatings will be sought. Overall the market for paint additives in Western Europe is forecast to increase at an average annual rate of between 3% and 4%, a few percent higher than the expected growth in the paint industry. Significant growth is anticipated in such products as water-based thickeners, in-can preservatives, defoamers and dispersants as demand for these types of products, suitable for water-based coatings, increases. Such products as driers used in solvent-based paints are expected to show only limited growth. Specially additives such as light stabilizers are expected to display exceptional growth. Opportunities exist for both established suppliers of paint additives and companies wishing to increase their presence or even enter this market for the first time. Kline S.A.'s new multiclient study "Paint Additives — Business Opportunities in Western Europe" is a comprehensive analysis of the size, structure, and culture of the paint additive business in Western Europe. Organised in two sections, the study firstly gives an overview of the business, including consumption of major paint additives in 1990 a discussion of trends in the industry an an appraisal of the key requirements for success. The second section describes the paint additives activities of a selection of successful companies serving this business. * * * Integrated paint tinting systems A new indepth multiclient survey to investigate the salient features and future potential for tinting systems for paints over the next decade has recently been initiated by Information Research Ltd (071-287 9322). The latest tinting systems essentially involve the use of a few base paints which are mixed wit h concentrated colorants designed to produce a wide range of qualities. Such tinting systems offer considerable advantage both for in-plant manufacture of coloured paints and also for in-can tinting at point-of-sale. In the case of in-plant tinting, small batches of the required colour can be economically produced in a short time from one or two base paints of each quality. The components of the system have to be matched and controlled for colour, hue and strength, and repeat batches can then easily be made without the need for excessive control of colour. There are advantages also for the use of tinting systems for the in-can production of paints of a specific colour, not only at trade and retail points-of-sale, but also in the paint factory. Only the base paint need be stocked and the minimum batch size is that of the smallest can. Hence an almost unlimited range of colours can be produced economically in very small quantities in a short time. The effects of the steadily increasing demand for colours, together with frequent fashion changes, are resulting in wider appreciation of the advantages of integrated tinting systems throughout Europe. However, the acceptance and use of tinting systems is complicated and depends on a number of factors, the importance of which can vary widely between different geographical regions. For example, they are increasingly important for industrial paints where customers expect rapid service to meet their "just-in- time" inventory requirements. They also have considerable advantages in more sparsely populated locations where deliveries of paint to sales outlets may be relatively infrequent.

Journal

Pigment & Resin TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 1991

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