Comment

Comment NOVEMBER 1976 PIGMENT AND RESIN TECHNOLOGY 5 "Fluffy" blacks still available A strong rumour that has been going the rounds over the past few weeks is that in 1977 the various grades of carbon black manufactured in the UK for surface coating and printing ink requirements will only be available in pellet form. From enquiries we have made it would appear that this is not the case, and "fluffy" blacks will continue to be available, at least for a year or two. The rumour probably stems from the fact that one lead­ ing supplier will be withdrawing one of their carbon black grades, which is used particularly in printing inks. However, it will be available in pellet form. Nevertheless, this does indicate an acceleration in the trend towards the use of pellet blacks and it is obviously only a question of time, per­ haps another two or at most three years, before they com­ pletely replace "fluffy" blacks. Surface coatings and printing inks only account for 2.5 to 3.0% of UK consumption of carbon blacks. Virtually all the rest is used in the rubber industry, where supply is now 100 % in pellet form, and to a lesser extent the plastics industry , nearly all in pellet form. The surface coatings and inks industry has plenty of experience in using pigment dispersions, including carbon blacks, and there are really no technological reasons why they cannot use pellet blacks. After all, the advantages are considerable, particularly the improved environmental condi­ tions resulting from their use. Lower transport costs for transportin g less bulky products and the greater ease of handling also offer economic advantages. Paint additives market to double in ten years Anothe r aspect of raw materials supply for the sur­ face coatings and printing inks industry is covered in a recently published report from Information Research Ltd (1 4 Clifford Street, London W1X 1RE). It concerns the market for paint additives in Europe over the next decade, and predicts that the present volume of around 53,000 metric tons , valued at over $130 million, will more than double by 1986, in spite of some significant decreases in demand for some materials which will be offset by increases for others. There are about 15 major classes of paint additives in widesprea d areas throughout Europe, each with a present value in excess of $450,00. Of these, the most important type s in tonnage terms are the driers, followed by wetting agents and coalescing agents, with antisetting agents and biocides being also of importance because of their high unit values. The report not only estimates the present markets for each of these major groups of materials for all the coun­ tries of Western Europe, but predicts the likely changes in national demand for each type over the next decade in the light of anticipated changes in types of surface coatings. The report also reviews the basic functions and charac­ teristics of each type of additive, and provides a broad over­ vie w of the spectrum of customers for these materials. Trends in the usage of specific compounds are commented upon , together with the resulting implications for paint manu­ facturers in the future. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pigment & Resin Technology Emerald Publishing

Comment

Pigment & Resin Technology, Volume 5 (11): 1 – Nov 1, 1976

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0369-9420
DOI
10.1108/eb041218
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

NOVEMBER 1976 PIGMENT AND RESIN TECHNOLOGY 5 "Fluffy" blacks still available A strong rumour that has been going the rounds over the past few weeks is that in 1977 the various grades of carbon black manufactured in the UK for surface coating and printing ink requirements will only be available in pellet form. From enquiries we have made it would appear that this is not the case, and "fluffy" blacks will continue to be available, at least for a year or two. The rumour probably stems from the fact that one lead­ ing supplier will be withdrawing one of their carbon black grades, which is used particularly in printing inks. However, it will be available in pellet form. Nevertheless, this does indicate an acceleration in the trend towards the use of pellet blacks and it is obviously only a question of time, per­ haps another two or at most three years, before they com­ pletely replace "fluffy" blacks. Surface coatings and printing inks only account for 2.5 to 3.0% of UK consumption of carbon blacks. Virtually all the rest is used in the rubber industry, where supply is now 100 % in pellet form, and to a lesser extent the plastics industry , nearly all in pellet form. The surface coatings and inks industry has plenty of experience in using pigment dispersions, including carbon blacks, and there are really no technological reasons why they cannot use pellet blacks. After all, the advantages are considerable, particularly the improved environmental condi­ tions resulting from their use. Lower transport costs for transportin g less bulky products and the greater ease of handling also offer economic advantages. Paint additives market to double in ten years Anothe r aspect of raw materials supply for the sur­ face coatings and printing inks industry is covered in a recently published report from Information Research Ltd (1 4 Clifford Street, London W1X 1RE). It concerns the market for paint additives in Europe over the next decade, and predicts that the present volume of around 53,000 metric tons , valued at over $130 million, will more than double by 1986, in spite of some significant decreases in demand for some materials which will be offset by increases for others. There are about 15 major classes of paint additives in widesprea d areas throughout Europe, each with a present value in excess of $450,00. Of these, the most important type s in tonnage terms are the driers, followed by wetting agents and coalescing agents, with antisetting agents and biocides being also of importance because of their high unit values. The report not only estimates the present markets for each of these major groups of materials for all the coun­ tries of Western Europe, but predicts the likely changes in national demand for each type over the next decade in the light of anticipated changes in types of surface coatings. The report also reviews the basic functions and charac­ teristics of each type of additive, and provides a broad over­ vie w of the spectrum of customers for these materials. Trends in the usage of specific compounds are commented upon , together with the resulting implications for paint manu­ facturers in the future.

Journal

Pigment & Resin TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 1976

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