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Comment

Comment March 1992 PIGMENT AND RESIN TECHNOLOGY 3 Ban on lead in paint Last month the Government announced new controls on the supply and use of a number of hazardous substances including lead in paint. The Environmental Protection (Controls on Injurious Substances) Regulations 1992 come into force on 28 February 1992. The Regulations ban the supply and use, from 28 February, of specfic lead sulphates and carbonates in paint, except for the restoration or maintenance of certain historic buildings, ancient monuments or works of art. They may only be used to restore or maintain historic textures and finishes. Anyone intending to supply or use the paint must complete a declaration and send it to a specified competent authority before doing so. The Regulations also control the supply and use of a number of other substances including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTSs); arsenic, mercury and organo- stannic compounds; and di-μ-oxo-di-n-butylstanniohydroxyborane (DBB). Anyone who will be affected by the restrictions should now take the necessary steps to comply. This particularly concerns those selling or using leaded paints. Those using or disposing of PCBs and PCTs — which are used, for example in electrical transformers and capacitors, will also have an interest. Member States are permitted on their territory the continued use of leaded paints for the restoration or maintenance of historic buildings or works of art. The Regulations ban the sale or use of particular lead carbonates and sulphates in paint, specified as in the Amentment by their Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) numbers, for any purpose except for the restoration or maintenance of Grade I or II (in Scotland, Category A) listed buildings, scheduled ancient monuments or works of art, and then only to restore or maintain historic textures and finishes. Paint supplied before 28 February 1992 is not subject to the restrictions. Anyone intending to supply or use the paint must complete a Declaration on supply or use, in the form set out in the Schedule to the Regulations, and send it to the competent authority specified in the Regulations (English Heritage, Historic Scotland, Cadw or the Conservation Unit, Museums and Galleries Commission) at least three weeks before doing so. The competent authority may advise that the intended use does not appear to fall within the uses allowed by the Regulations, and that the supplier may be committing a criminal offence if she/he supplies the paint, and the user may be committing a criminal offence if she/he uses it. If it suspects that paint may be supplied or used for illegal purposes, it may refer the case to the Crown Prosecution Service (in Scotland, the Procurator Fiscal) for investigation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pigment & Resin Technology Emerald Publishing

Comment

Pigment & Resin Technology , Volume 21 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1992

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0369-9420
DOI
10.1108/eb042918
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

March 1992 PIGMENT AND RESIN TECHNOLOGY 3 Ban on lead in paint Last month the Government announced new controls on the supply and use of a number of hazardous substances including lead in paint. The Environmental Protection (Controls on Injurious Substances) Regulations 1992 come into force on 28 February 1992. The Regulations ban the supply and use, from 28 February, of specfic lead sulphates and carbonates in paint, except for the restoration or maintenance of certain historic buildings, ancient monuments or works of art. They may only be used to restore or maintain historic textures and finishes. Anyone intending to supply or use the paint must complete a declaration and send it to a specified competent authority before doing so. The Regulations also control the supply and use of a number of other substances including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTSs); arsenic, mercury and organo- stannic compounds; and di-μ-oxo-di-n-butylstanniohydroxyborane (DBB). Anyone who will be affected by the restrictions should now take the necessary steps to comply. This particularly concerns those selling or using leaded paints. Those using or disposing of PCBs and PCTs — which are used, for example in electrical transformers and capacitors, will also have an interest. Member States are permitted on their territory the continued use of leaded paints for the restoration or maintenance of historic buildings or works of art. The Regulations ban the sale or use of particular lead carbonates and sulphates in paint, specified as in the Amentment by their Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) numbers, for any purpose except for the restoration or maintenance of Grade I or II (in Scotland, Category A) listed buildings, scheduled ancient monuments or works of art, and then only to restore or maintain historic textures and finishes. Paint supplied before 28 February 1992 is not subject to the restrictions. Anyone intending to supply or use the paint must complete a Declaration on supply or use, in the form set out in the Schedule to the Regulations, and send it to the competent authority specified in the Regulations (English Heritage, Historic Scotland, Cadw or the Conservation Unit, Museums and Galleries Commission) at least three weeks before doing so. The competent authority may advise that the intended use does not appear to fall within the uses allowed by the Regulations, and that the supplier may be committing a criminal offence if she/he supplies the paint, and the user may be committing a criminal offence if she/he uses it. If it suspects that paint may be supplied or used for illegal purposes, it may refer the case to the Crown Prosecution Service (in Scotland, the Procurator Fiscal) for investigation.

Journal

Pigment & Resin TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1992

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