Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

“Come together”: a thematic analysis of experiences with belonging

“Come together”: a thematic analysis of experiences with belonging The purpose of this paper is to explore, describe and interpret two research questions: How do persons with co-occurring mental health and substance abuse problems, living in supportive housing, experience belonging? How do residential support staff experience promoting a sense of belonging for persons with co-occurring mental health and substance abuse problems, living in a supportive housing?Design/methodology/approachIndividual semi-structured interviews were conducted with five persons with co-occurring mental health and substance abuse problems living in supportive housing in a Norwegian district. In addition, one semi-structured focus group was conducted with nine residential support staff. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using thematic analysis.FindingsAnalysis resulted in three main themes: “I do not go to sleep in my pajamas”, “Do I have a choice?” and “Be kind to each other”.Research limitations/implicationsMore research on how inclusive practices that are commonly described in guidelines actually affect the experience of residents and residential support staff is needed.Practical implicationsPractices that incorporate a communal and contextual understanding when assigning supportive housing are warranted.Originality/valueBy paying attention to the components of social recovery, this paper provides a nuanced understanding of how persons with co-occurring mental health and substance abuse problems, living in supportive housing, experience belonging. In addition, residential support staffs’ experiences with promoting a sense of belonging for this group are explored. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advances in Dual Diagnosis Emerald Publishing

“Come together”: a thematic analysis of experiences with belonging

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/come-together-a-thematic-analysis-of-experiences-with-belonging-KWVpnC45dT
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1757-0972
DOI
10.1108/add-03-2020-0002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to explore, describe and interpret two research questions: How do persons with co-occurring mental health and substance abuse problems, living in supportive housing, experience belonging? How do residential support staff experience promoting a sense of belonging for persons with co-occurring mental health and substance abuse problems, living in a supportive housing?Design/methodology/approachIndividual semi-structured interviews were conducted with five persons with co-occurring mental health and substance abuse problems living in supportive housing in a Norwegian district. In addition, one semi-structured focus group was conducted with nine residential support staff. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using thematic analysis.FindingsAnalysis resulted in three main themes: “I do not go to sleep in my pajamas”, “Do I have a choice?” and “Be kind to each other”.Research limitations/implicationsMore research on how inclusive practices that are commonly described in guidelines actually affect the experience of residents and residential support staff is needed.Practical implicationsPractices that incorporate a communal and contextual understanding when assigning supportive housing are warranted.Originality/valueBy paying attention to the components of social recovery, this paper provides a nuanced understanding of how persons with co-occurring mental health and substance abuse problems, living in supportive housing, experience belonging. In addition, residential support staffs’ experiences with promoting a sense of belonging for this group are explored.

Journal

Advances in Dual DiagnosisEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 26, 2020

Keywords: Social inclusion; Supportive housing; Social recovery; Qualitative participatory methods; Belonging; Co-occurring mental health and substance abuse problems

References