Colour consultation with dementia home residents and staff

Colour consultation with dementia home residents and staff Purpose – Government guidelines promote service user consultation without providing extensive advice on people in later dementia. “Seen as too difficult to involve, they are effectively excluded from (…) influenc(ing) service provision”, especially institutional care residents (Clare and Cox, 2003, p. 936). This hard‐to‐reach group presents methodological challenges. The purpose of this paper is to explore innovative approaches, offering even those with fragmented or lost speech the opportunity to contribute to decisions about their care. Design/methodology/approach – This specialist dementia home consultation included staff and every resident, irrespective of the level of their communication impairment. Consultation on potential colour schemes took the form of a ballot. Staff helped develop an unpatronising, person‐centred approach. Visual aids supported communication, de‐emphasising the spoken word and promoting inclusion. Findings – The majority of residents appeared to express an opinion on the potential decor. Others chose a colour while not necessarily grasping the context. The approach engaged all except four. Research limitations/implications – Even people with moderate/advanced dementia may be enabled to participate in consultation. Further research needs to refine methodology to include everyone and clarify the interpretation of results. Practical implications – Service providers may widen their expectations of inclusivity in consultation exercises. Originality/value – This consultation is important to researchers and practitioners because it explores ways of communicating, which avoid privileging the spoken word, revealing seldom‐recognised abilities in people with moderate/advanced dementia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Emerald Publishing

Colour consultation with dementia home residents and staff

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, Volume 15 (2): 18 – Jun 3, 2014

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1471-7794
DOI
10.1108/QAOA-04-2013-0006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – Government guidelines promote service user consultation without providing extensive advice on people in later dementia. “Seen as too difficult to involve, they are effectively excluded from (…) influenc(ing) service provision”, especially institutional care residents (Clare and Cox, 2003, p. 936). This hard‐to‐reach group presents methodological challenges. The purpose of this paper is to explore innovative approaches, offering even those with fragmented or lost speech the opportunity to contribute to decisions about their care. Design/methodology/approach – This specialist dementia home consultation included staff and every resident, irrespective of the level of their communication impairment. Consultation on potential colour schemes took the form of a ballot. Staff helped develop an unpatronising, person‐centred approach. Visual aids supported communication, de‐emphasising the spoken word and promoting inclusion. Findings – The majority of residents appeared to express an opinion on the potential decor. Others chose a colour while not necessarily grasping the context. The approach engaged all except four. Research limitations/implications – Even people with moderate/advanced dementia may be enabled to participate in consultation. Further research needs to refine methodology to include everyone and clarify the interpretation of results. Practical implications – Service providers may widen their expectations of inclusivity in consultation exercises. Originality/value – This consultation is important to researchers and practitioners because it explores ways of communicating, which avoid privileging the spoken word, revealing seldom‐recognised abilities in people with moderate/advanced dementia.

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 3, 2014

Keywords: Communication; Social inclusion; Dementia; Care homes; Rementia; User consultation

References

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