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Collective and individual improvement activities: the role of reward systems

Collective and individual improvement activities: the role of reward systems Mechanisms for increasing participation of employees in problem-solving activities such as continuous improvement (CI) programmes often include the use of problem-solving teams. Teams can support problem solving by emphasizing accountability for the production process within the work unit, thereby increasing the sense of responsibility for (local) problems. However, it is unclear how effort within these organisational forms should be rewarded. This article describes the use of problem-solving teams within a UK automotive component company, and examines the implications for human resource policy, in particular for the reward and recognition systems. The article outlines the outcomes that ensued when two reward systems existed, one for team-based activities and another for individual suggestions. The contradictions of the two systems are considered in the context of the organisation's historical individualistic approach to reward systems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Review Emerald Publishing

Collective and individual improvement activities: the role of reward systems

Personnel Review , Volume 31 (3): 18 – Jun 1, 2002

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References (56)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0048-3486
DOI
10.1108/00483480210422732
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mechanisms for increasing participation of employees in problem-solving activities such as continuous improvement (CI) programmes often include the use of problem-solving teams. Teams can support problem solving by emphasizing accountability for the production process within the work unit, thereby increasing the sense of responsibility for (local) problems. However, it is unclear how effort within these organisational forms should be rewarded. This article describes the use of problem-solving teams within a UK automotive component company, and examines the implications for human resource policy, in particular for the reward and recognition systems. The article outlines the outcomes that ensued when two reward systems existed, one for team-based activities and another for individual suggestions. The contradictions of the two systems are considered in the context of the organisation's historical individualistic approach to reward systems.

Journal

Personnel ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2002

Keywords: Teams; Problem solving; Continuous improvement; Reward

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