Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Collaboration: “easy to say, difficult to do”

Collaboration: “easy to say, difficult to do” PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to recount 12 months of a pioneering collaboration between the Aneurin Bevan University Health Board, five local authorities and nine registered social landlords in South East Wales. It will aim to share the understanding that has emerged, demonstrating how a large number of agencies, many of which have different purposes or which have traditionally been in competition with each other, have been able to work collaboratively, to meet the interests of some very vulnerable people.Design/methodology/approachThis reflective approach draws on the views of a large number of staff from each of the three constituent public sector service areas and their experience of collaborative working using action research principles. The study will use people’s own words to highlight real experiences, but analysed against similar collaborative activity elsewhere reflected in the literature. As there has been no established pathway for the collaboration to follow, we have adopted a Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle to capture the evolving “In One Place” (IOP) process.FindingsThis paper highlights the inherent systemic barriers that have to be identified and overcome if the authors are to move from wishful thinking to pragmatic realism, both within and between organisations. The sense of public sector agencies being able to work together, simply because it makes good sense, is challenged and the paper identifies both cultural and professional factors that made a difference in this collaboration, which could be harnessed elsewhere.Originality/valueFrom the outset, a key driver for the IOP has been to align health, social care and housing processes by bringing together practitioners and senior managers to identify need and to plan and deliver services locally, offering a real benefit to individuals with complex needs. This is set within the context of increasing demand on public services, financial austerity and the history of “housing” being on the margins of discussion when considering the integration of health and social care services. The authors are able to demonstrate the benefit of housing being at the centre of such discussions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Integrated Care Emerald Publishing

Collaboration: “easy to say, difficult to do”

Journal of Integrated Care , Volume 23 (4): 18 – Aug 17, 2015

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/collaboration-easy-to-say-difficult-to-do-nvMGh0pd6b

References (5)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1476-9018
DOI
10.1108/JICA-07-2015-0028
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to recount 12 months of a pioneering collaboration between the Aneurin Bevan University Health Board, five local authorities and nine registered social landlords in South East Wales. It will aim to share the understanding that has emerged, demonstrating how a large number of agencies, many of which have different purposes or which have traditionally been in competition with each other, have been able to work collaboratively, to meet the interests of some very vulnerable people.Design/methodology/approachThis reflective approach draws on the views of a large number of staff from each of the three constituent public sector service areas and their experience of collaborative working using action research principles. The study will use people’s own words to highlight real experiences, but analysed against similar collaborative activity elsewhere reflected in the literature. As there has been no established pathway for the collaboration to follow, we have adopted a Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle to capture the evolving “In One Place” (IOP) process.FindingsThis paper highlights the inherent systemic barriers that have to be identified and overcome if the authors are to move from wishful thinking to pragmatic realism, both within and between organisations. The sense of public sector agencies being able to work together, simply because it makes good sense, is challenged and the paper identifies both cultural and professional factors that made a difference in this collaboration, which could be harnessed elsewhere.Originality/valueFrom the outset, a key driver for the IOP has been to align health, social care and housing processes by bringing together practitioners and senior managers to identify need and to plan and deliver services locally, offering a real benefit to individuals with complex needs. This is set within the context of increasing demand on public services, financial austerity and the history of “housing” being on the margins of discussion when considering the integration of health and social care services. The authors are able to demonstrate the benefit of housing being at the centre of such discussions.

Journal

Journal of Integrated CareEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 17, 2015

There are no references for this article.