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Coaching as a strategic intervention

Coaching as a strategic intervention Introduces maximizing the benefits of coaching at a strategic level, rather than focusing purely on individual development, using The Royal Bank of Scotland Group (RBSG) as an example. Highlights how many organisations are failing to capture the broad benefits of coaching by seeing it purely as an as individual development intervention. This is classified first generation coaching with limited organisational impact. Additional benefits can be realised when the organisational sponsor takes a "quality control" perspective, and seeks to evaluate the effectiveness of the coaching intervention. This is described as the second generation of coaching. Another, and extremely powerful, element, which is rarely tapped, is the coaches' learning. The third generation of coaching achieves the benefits of the first and second generation, but also harnesses and disseminates the learning the coach gains about the organization, to the benefit of the business and its people, thus realizing the maximum benefits of the coaching investment. Applies third generation coaching and describes working with RBSG and learning with them as they transform, utilizing coaching to its maximum benefit. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial and Commercial Training Emerald Publishing

Coaching as a strategic intervention

Industrial and Commercial Training , Volume 34 (6): 4 – Nov 1, 2002

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References (1)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0019-7858
DOI
10.1108/00197850210442476
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduces maximizing the benefits of coaching at a strategic level, rather than focusing purely on individual development, using The Royal Bank of Scotland Group (RBSG) as an example. Highlights how many organisations are failing to capture the broad benefits of coaching by seeing it purely as an as individual development intervention. This is classified first generation coaching with limited organisational impact. Additional benefits can be realised when the organisational sponsor takes a "quality control" perspective, and seeks to evaluate the effectiveness of the coaching intervention. This is described as the second generation of coaching. Another, and extremely powerful, element, which is rarely tapped, is the coaches' learning. The third generation of coaching achieves the benefits of the first and second generation, but also harnesses and disseminates the learning the coach gains about the organization, to the benefit of the business and its people, thus realizing the maximum benefits of the coaching investment. Applies third generation coaching and describes working with RBSG and learning with them as they transform, utilizing coaching to its maximum benefit.

Journal

Industrial and Commercial TrainingEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 1, 2002

Keywords: Human resource management; Benefits; Organizational change

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