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Clearing the Loft

Clearing the Loft Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XX No 235 SEPTEMBER 1948 such a catalogue. We would refer those wishing to delve further to a new edition of our booklet 1929-1948', which we originally intro­ HE article on the application of conics to the layout of air­ duced at the S.B.A.C. Display last year, and which we have revised craft by M R CAMPBELL, which we publish in this issue, is the and brought up to date to mark the fresh arrival of this annual Tlatest of a number, constituting in effect a series on the sub­ event. We hope all readers who call at our stand, as well as any ject though not designed as such, and has from the insular point of others who care to apply for it, will obtain a copy of this list of the view a special interest because it is the first giving an account of principal articles that have appeared in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING since British practice as exemplified by the Blackburn Aircraft Company. its inception; classified under subject headings so far as the last The previous two papers, which are referred to in a footnote to this eight years are concerned. This, we venture to think, is of con­ present one, were contributed by members of the design staffs of siderably more than merely domestic interest as it provides, if North American Aviation and Fleetwing Aircraft respectively, and examined in detail, an historical commentary on the various aspects therefore represented transatlantic predilections. The truth is, of of the design of aeroplanes and their equipment and shows their course, that there are as many ideas on applying the method as there trends. One sees how various subjects arouse interest at different are firms—if not, indeed, individuals—utilizing it. We have perhaps times and for a few months, perhaps, provide material for articles; done our part by introducing some of these and it would become only to die out when superseded by some newer development. Even merely tedious to continue reproducing variations on a theme which more striking, perhaps, is the recurrence in a new guise of some is by now becoming familiar. matter which had seemed to be concluded. A Wider Range Buy British The application of conic sections to lofting is, of course, only a In his new survey of the production of a British aeroplane M R particular usage of a general design 'tool'—analytical geometry. STEVENS deals, at the firm's request, with the manufacture of the This was introduced to the columns of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING in Hawker Sea Fury. This will be of value not only to readers at home July 1943 by MESSRS GARVEY and HETZEL, with particular reference but to those in other countries—such as Canada, Irak, the Nether­ to the limited subject of undercarriage design, and received a wider lands and Pakistan—who are adopting this ship-plane for opera­ interpretation in the publication in June 1946 of a paper, originally tional use with their navies. There is, indeed, beginning to show circulated among the members of its design staff by the Glenn L. itself a leaning towards what may almost be called something ap­ Martin Company, which dealt with the employment of the method, proaching a measure of standardization on certain types of British in preference to descriptive geometry, for the graphical determination combat aeroplanes among Western European nations as well as in of such details as wing members. the Dominions. As examples of this trend, we may instance not only The manifest convenience, and time and space-saving advantages, the Vampire, orders for which have been placed over here for the of the system has led to a considerable increase in the number of equipment of the Norwegian, Swedish and Swiss Air Forces, and the individuals resorting to it and we are glad to think that our policy in Firefly (for the Netherlands), but, even more significant perhaps, the devoting space to it from time to time may have had something to do arrangements which have been come to for the building under with its spread. For unless we were very mistaken, and we do not licence of the Sea Fury and the Meteor in the Netherlands and the think we were, in believing when we first called attention to it that latter also in France. Whether this is, as has been stated, the outcome it was at that time, we will not say unknown, but at any rate largely of a common policy or merely a natural move towards what is best neglected, it has in the last few years drawn to itself many new we have no direct knowledge. We cannot, however, refrain from adherents. commenting, with some bitterness, that these tributes to the high quality of British military aircraft are in striking contrast to the pre­ cisely opposite policy of our Government in withholding support A History in Miniature from its own industry by continuing to buy commercial aeroplanes We have not listed here all the articles on analytic methods that from abroad. have appeared in these columns because this is hardly the place for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Clearing the Loft

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 20 (9): 1 – Sep 1, 1948

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031664
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aircraft Engineering THE MONTHLY SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XX No 235 SEPTEMBER 1948 such a catalogue. We would refer those wishing to delve further to a new edition of our booklet 1929-1948', which we originally intro­ HE article on the application of conics to the layout of air­ duced at the S.B.A.C. Display last year, and which we have revised craft by M R CAMPBELL, which we publish in this issue, is the and brought up to date to mark the fresh arrival of this annual Tlatest of a number, constituting in effect a series on the sub­ event. We hope all readers who call at our stand, as well as any ject though not designed as such, and has from the insular point of others who care to apply for it, will obtain a copy of this list of the view a special interest because it is the first giving an account of principal articles that have appeared in AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING since British practice as exemplified by the Blackburn Aircraft Company. its inception; classified under subject headings so far as the last The previous two papers, which are referred to in a footnote to this eight years are concerned. This, we venture to think, is of con­ present one, were contributed by members of the design staffs of siderably more than merely domestic interest as it provides, if North American Aviation and Fleetwing Aircraft respectively, and examined in detail, an historical commentary on the various aspects therefore represented transatlantic predilections. The truth is, of of the design of aeroplanes and their equipment and shows their course, that there are as many ideas on applying the method as there trends. One sees how various subjects arouse interest at different are firms—if not, indeed, individuals—utilizing it. We have perhaps times and for a few months, perhaps, provide material for articles; done our part by introducing some of these and it would become only to die out when superseded by some newer development. Even merely tedious to continue reproducing variations on a theme which more striking, perhaps, is the recurrence in a new guise of some is by now becoming familiar. matter which had seemed to be concluded. A Wider Range Buy British The application of conic sections to lofting is, of course, only a In his new survey of the production of a British aeroplane M R particular usage of a general design 'tool'—analytical geometry. STEVENS deals, at the firm's request, with the manufacture of the This was introduced to the columns of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING in Hawker Sea Fury. This will be of value not only to readers at home July 1943 by MESSRS GARVEY and HETZEL, with particular reference but to those in other countries—such as Canada, Irak, the Nether­ to the limited subject of undercarriage design, and received a wider lands and Pakistan—who are adopting this ship-plane for opera­ interpretation in the publication in June 1946 of a paper, originally tional use with their navies. There is, indeed, beginning to show circulated among the members of its design staff by the Glenn L. itself a leaning towards what may almost be called something ap­ Martin Company, which dealt with the employment of the method, proaching a measure of standardization on certain types of British in preference to descriptive geometry, for the graphical determination combat aeroplanes among Western European nations as well as in of such details as wing members. the Dominions. As examples of this trend, we may instance not only The manifest convenience, and time and space-saving advantages, the Vampire, orders for which have been placed over here for the of the system has led to a considerable increase in the number of equipment of the Norwegian, Swedish and Swiss Air Forces, and the individuals resorting to it and we are glad to think that our policy in Firefly (for the Netherlands), but, even more significant perhaps, the devoting space to it from time to time may have had something to do arrangements which have been come to for the building under with its spread. For unless we were very mistaken, and we do not licence of the Sea Fury and the Meteor in the Netherlands and the think we were, in believing when we first called attention to it that latter also in France. Whether this is, as has been stated, the outcome it was at that time, we will not say unknown, but at any rate largely of a common policy or merely a natural move towards what is best neglected, it has in the last few years drawn to itself many new we have no direct knowledge. We cannot, however, refrain from adherents. commenting, with some bitterness, that these tributes to the high quality of British military aircraft are in striking contrast to the pre­ cisely opposite policy of our Government in withholding support A History in Miniature from its own industry by continuing to buy commercial aeroplanes We have not listed here all the articles on analytic methods that from abroad. have appeared in these columns because this is hardly the place for

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1948

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