Class, consumerism and education

Class, consumerism and education Contemporary views concerning the management of change in the literature on organizational theory deal with the issue of change on two levels. The first is descriptive and seeks to perceive and list manifestations of change. The second is analytical and attempts to categorize change in terms of abstract concepts. Aims to apply a dialectical analysis to the nature of change in organizations in order to highlight the fact that social class as an issue in management theory has become marginalized. Intends to argue that the application of laissez‐faire economics to welfare provision, especially in the sphere of education, is continuing to result in an unequitable system. As educationalists, if we seriously wish to provide an equitable system of education we need to develop a critique of how programmes of legislation, not just education, but also in areas such as housing and social services, are funded for specific purposes by central government. It is inadvisable to assume that these programmes will have the achievement of equality of provisions as a central objective. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Educational Management Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0951-354X
DOI
10.1108/09513549810220641
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporary views concerning the management of change in the literature on organizational theory deal with the issue of change on two levels. The first is descriptive and seeks to perceive and list manifestations of change. The second is analytical and attempts to categorize change in terms of abstract concepts. Aims to apply a dialectical analysis to the nature of change in organizations in order to highlight the fact that social class as an issue in management theory has become marginalized. Intends to argue that the application of laissez‐faire economics to welfare provision, especially in the sphere of education, is continuing to result in an unequitable system. As educationalists, if we seriously wish to provide an equitable system of education we need to develop a critique of how programmes of legislation, not just education, but also in areas such as housing and social services, are funded for specific purposes by central government. It is inadvisable to assume that these programmes will have the achievement of equality of provisions as a central objective.

Journal

International Journal of Educational ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 1998

Keywords: Consumerism; Education; Organizational change; Social class; Welfare

References

  • LMS: the managerial climate and its effects on the interpersonal climate of the school
    Doyle, J.L.; Wells, J.

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