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City Memories: Reminiscence as creative therapy

City Memories: Reminiscence as creative therapy This paper describes and evaluates a recent innovative project in Liverpool that brought together the skills and creative vision of a major national museums group in partnership with the housing action trust. ‘City Memories’ created opportunities for older people to take part in reminiscence activities at the museums and in a large extra care housing setting in the community. Training was provided for community leaders, care home managers and care workers in order to help them apply some of the ideas in their own work. The project looked at outcomes for older people who participated in terms of increased stimulus and sense of well‐being, with a special focus on those with conditions such as stroke and dementia. It is hoped that such work will inspire others to put therapeutic reminiscence into practice in their own settings and circumstances; and that it may be possible at some stage to conduct a more systematic study to test the benefits of this approach in relation to measurable health gain. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Emerald Publishing

City Memories: Reminiscence as creative therapy

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults , Volume 6 (4): 8 – Dec 1, 2005

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1471-7794
DOI
10.1108/14717794200500025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper describes and evaluates a recent innovative project in Liverpool that brought together the skills and creative vision of a major national museums group in partnership with the housing action trust. ‘City Memories’ created opportunities for older people to take part in reminiscence activities at the museums and in a large extra care housing setting in the community. Training was provided for community leaders, care home managers and care workers in order to help them apply some of the ideas in their own work. The project looked at outcomes for older people who participated in terms of increased stimulus and sense of well‐being, with a special focus on those with conditions such as stroke and dementia. It is hoped that such work will inspire others to put therapeutic reminiscence into practice in their own settings and circumstances; and that it may be possible at some stage to conduct a more systematic study to test the benefits of this approach in relation to measurable health gain.

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2005

Keywords: Memories; Older people; Reminiscence; Care settings; Creative therapy; Innovative project

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