Citizen oversight, procedural justice, and officer perceptions of the complaint investigation process

Citizen oversight, procedural justice, and officer perceptions of the complaint investigation... Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine data from a survey of police officers in a Western US city, showing the factors that shape police officers' satisfaction with their city's system for investigating and resolving citizen complaints alleging officer misconduct. Specifically, it tests whether perceptions of legitimate authority and procedural justice influence overall satisfaction, and how these two theoretical perspectives fare relative to a distributive justice perspective. Design/methodology/approach – This paper uses anonymous mailed surveys to examine the attitudes of a sample of 373 police officer respondents from one large urban police department. Findings – The findings support the importance of both procedural justice and perceived legitimacy by finding that both perspectives shape officers' satisfaction more than the actual outcomes reached on their cases. Attitudes toward oversight were not found to be related to satisfaction with the complaint process. Research limitations/implications – This paper focuses on only one city and has a relatively small number of respondents. Originality/value – In this paper the analyses expand these theoretical perspectives by applying them to a unique and important group, the police themselves, whose attitude toward citizen complaints and police accountability has been largely neglected by the prior research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management Emerald Publishing

Citizen oversight, procedural justice, and officer perceptions of the complaint investigation process

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1363-951X
DOI
10.1108/13639510710833929
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine data from a survey of police officers in a Western US city, showing the factors that shape police officers' satisfaction with their city's system for investigating and resolving citizen complaints alleging officer misconduct. Specifically, it tests whether perceptions of legitimate authority and procedural justice influence overall satisfaction, and how these two theoretical perspectives fare relative to a distributive justice perspective. Design/methodology/approach – This paper uses anonymous mailed surveys to examine the attitudes of a sample of 373 police officer respondents from one large urban police department. Findings – The findings support the importance of both procedural justice and perceived legitimacy by finding that both perspectives shape officers' satisfaction more than the actual outcomes reached on their cases. Attitudes toward oversight were not found to be related to satisfaction with the complaint process. Research limitations/implications – This paper focuses on only one city and has a relatively small number of respondents. Originality/value – In this paper the analyses expand these theoretical perspectives by applying them to a unique and important group, the police themselves, whose attitude toward citizen complaints and police accountability has been largely neglected by the prior research.

Journal

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 13, 2007

Keywords: Police; Complaints; Justice; Career satisfaction

References

  • Taking stock: toward a richer understanding of police culture
    Paoline, E.
  • The role of procedural justice and legitimacy in shaping public support for the police
    Sunshine, J.; Tyler, T.
  • Profiling and police legitimacy: procedural justice, attributions of motive, and acceptance of police authority
    Tyler, T.; Wakslak, C.
  • Police complaints and the complainants' experience
    Waters, I.; Brown, K.

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