Cinderella in fetters

Cinderella in fetters A IKC K A F T ]•: N G I X K K R 1 X G 1 January . 1943 were written), of at least 25 types, all of which, except perhaps for one or two recently obtained from America, arc obsolescent; Aircraft Engineering many obsolete and some nearly worn out having flown over 1,000,000 miles. According to information supplied by MR. Devote d to th e Science an d Practice of Aero­ PERKINS, in a speech introducing a debate on civil aviation nautic s and to Allied and Subsidiary in the House of Commons on December 17, we have in develop­ ment the " York " (converted and partly redesigned from a Branche s of th e Engineering Industry four-cngined bomber, since revealed by a contemporary as the Editor:Lieut.-Col. \V. LockwoodMarsh, O.D.E., F.R.Ac.S.,M.S.A.E.,F.I.Ac.S. "Lancaster") and what he called the " W " (converted from what he described as " an R.A.F. outcast "). January 1943 Vol. XV, No. 167 Air Ministry Complacency CAITAIN HAROLD BALFOUR is, we gather from a statement made by him in the House on another occasion, perfectly satisfied, and E have recently received the September issue of "The expecting the nation to be equally content, that we should look Bee-Hive", the house organ of United Aircraft Corporation, forward to carrying on with converted bombers for two or three and \vc feel that no better introduction to a consideration years after the war, while new civil types are being designed and of the plight of British Civil Aviation could be provided than the produced. The answer to this is that we " had some " at the end quotation of a few extracts from the main article contained in it. of the last war and it was this making do with converted war types The words printed within brackets are, it should be explained, in British commercial aviation which enabled other countries to interpellations of our own. obtain a lead over us which we never regained right up to 1939. America Triumphans A Question of Money " Airlines operating under ATC (U.S. Army Air Transport Com­ In the course of the debate to which we have referred he made a mand) supervision are currently flying ten times the peace-time great debating point that during 1942 British Overseas Airways had mileage of all the world's airlines combined." " Seventeen U.S. received from the British Government the sum of £5,000,000; which airlines . . . operating under the direction of the ATC—but retaining he described as " not such dusty crumbs " to fall from the rich man's their individual entities— . . . were asked to operate over routes table. Since this represents the expenditure of approximately which were world-wide in their scope." " Although routes and one day on the production of war types we beg to differ from destinations are naturally military secicts, the ATC recently made CAITAIN BALFOUR, and we challenge him to give an estimate of the it public that TWA (Transcontinental & Western Airways), Ameri­ amount expended by the American Government on the production can Airlines, and Northeast Airlines have been assigned to North and operation of the cargo aircraft and services mentioned above Atlantic zones (to Iceland and Great Britain) ; Pan American Air­ during the three months since A.T.C. was formed—to' go no ways and Northwest Airlines are flying into Alaska ; Western Air­ further back. The comparison would be extremely startling and lines operates routes into Canada; Braniff has been assigned might even stagger the complacency of CAPTAIN BALFOUR. Central American destinations ; Eastern Airlines is flying across the Caribbean into South America ; United Airlines is spanning the Pacific (to Australia and New Zealand) and PAA (Pan-American An Unjustifiable Hope Airways) continues its established routes beyond the West Coast In the course of his reply to the debate the Under-Secretary and Hawaii. Supplementing this, Pan-American is also flying to endeavoured to comfort us by saying that it is well under­ points in the Caribbean, and covers the South Atlantic and also stood with the Americans that they are acquiring no vested rights flies across Africa to points eastward." (our italics.) " Three large as regards routes they arc now running for military purposes U.S. aircraft manufacturers—Douglas, Curtiss-Wright and Con­ on lines which may have commercial values after the war. This solidated—are currently producing cargo carrying planes at top is, unfortunately, not very convincing and, with the greatest speed, while a fourth—Lockheed—is gearing up for production of respect, we do not think he knew what he was talking about. a four-engine 80,000 lb. monoplane (" Constellation "). " Pooling Our reason for saying so is that' a message from its Washington their experience into one great organization known as ' Air Lines correspondent dated December 28, and published in The Times the War Training ' (the airlines) created a national programme for following day, gives " the principles or policies upon which this schooling pilots, mechanics, flight-engineers and other personnel country (the U.S.A.) will seek to establish an agreement with officers. Financed by the participating airlines themselves, this Britain and other nations to cover the field of commercial flying programme is expected to yield sufficient quantities of pilots, co­ after the war." The third of these reads : " The principle of' free­ pilots, navigators and mechanics to maintain cargo airplanes in dom of the air' meaning that any country could license commercial every combat area, as well as to keep their own passenger services aircraft for commerce between their own country and an}' other or intact." (our italics.) between two or more foreign countries." How about it, CAITAIN BALFOUR ? If wc agree to this, apparently eminently reasonable, proposition, how can we protest against the United States continuing Mass Production of Commercial Types to operate for commercial flying any or all of the services over the As a corollary to, and in confirmation of, these extracts may be routes given in " The Bee-Hive " as in operation by them to-day? quoted a statement issued by the Aeronautical Chamber of Com­ No doubt the British Empire could start services in competition, merce that at the end of September last one-fifth of the multi­ but what chance should we have ? engined production in the United States was allocated to cargo air­ craft and that this proportion was expected to rise to one-third She's Got the Ships . . . during the first half of 1943. The house organ of Pan-American Airways, reporting an address by Major-Gcneral H. L. George, America will have the machines, she will have the ground commanding ATC, forecast American cargo aircraft flying to Europe organization, she will have the trained, experienced personnel. 24 times a day and to Australia and India 20 or 30 times a week. I t is not reasonable to suppose that she will agree immediately at the end of the war to retire and leave all these routes 'without The Obverse air communication during the two or three, or more, years it would take us to get something going. It is not in human nature That is, from the standpoint of British aviation, the reverse side to imagine anything so fantastic ; particularly as, according to one of the coin. Here is the obverse. British Overseas Airways are of the principles to which she is going to invite our agreement, she reported to possess at the present time exactly 100 aeroplanes would be perfectly entitled to continue. (unless some have been withdrawn from operation since these lines http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Cinderella in fetters

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 15 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 1943

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/cinderella-in-fetters-i6gHWwbXQ0
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030978
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A IKC K A F T ]•: N G I X K K R 1 X G 1 January . 1943 were written), of at least 25 types, all of which, except perhaps for one or two recently obtained from America, arc obsolescent; Aircraft Engineering many obsolete and some nearly worn out having flown over 1,000,000 miles. According to information supplied by MR. Devote d to th e Science an d Practice of Aero­ PERKINS, in a speech introducing a debate on civil aviation nautic s and to Allied and Subsidiary in the House of Commons on December 17, we have in develop­ ment the " York " (converted and partly redesigned from a Branche s of th e Engineering Industry four-cngined bomber, since revealed by a contemporary as the Editor:Lieut.-Col. \V. LockwoodMarsh, O.D.E., F.R.Ac.S.,M.S.A.E.,F.I.Ac.S. "Lancaster") and what he called the " W " (converted from what he described as " an R.A.F. outcast "). January 1943 Vol. XV, No. 167 Air Ministry Complacency CAITAIN HAROLD BALFOUR is, we gather from a statement made by him in the House on another occasion, perfectly satisfied, and E have recently received the September issue of "The expecting the nation to be equally content, that we should look Bee-Hive", the house organ of United Aircraft Corporation, forward to carrying on with converted bombers for two or three and \vc feel that no better introduction to a consideration years after the war, while new civil types are being designed and of the plight of British Civil Aviation could be provided than the produced. The answer to this is that we " had some " at the end quotation of a few extracts from the main article contained in it. of the last war and it was this making do with converted war types The words printed within brackets are, it should be explained, in British commercial aviation which enabled other countries to interpellations of our own. obtain a lead over us which we never regained right up to 1939. America Triumphans A Question of Money " Airlines operating under ATC (U.S. Army Air Transport Com­ In the course of the debate to which we have referred he made a mand) supervision are currently flying ten times the peace-time great debating point that during 1942 British Overseas Airways had mileage of all the world's airlines combined." " Seventeen U.S. received from the British Government the sum of £5,000,000; which airlines . . . operating under the direction of the ATC—but retaining he described as " not such dusty crumbs " to fall from the rich man's their individual entities— . . . were asked to operate over routes table. Since this represents the expenditure of approximately which were world-wide in their scope." " Although routes and one day on the production of war types we beg to differ from destinations are naturally military secicts, the ATC recently made CAITAIN BALFOUR, and we challenge him to give an estimate of the it public that TWA (Transcontinental & Western Airways), Ameri­ amount expended by the American Government on the production can Airlines, and Northeast Airlines have been assigned to North and operation of the cargo aircraft and services mentioned above Atlantic zones (to Iceland and Great Britain) ; Pan American Air­ during the three months since A.T.C. was formed—to' go no ways and Northwest Airlines are flying into Alaska ; Western Air­ further back. The comparison would be extremely startling and lines operates routes into Canada; Braniff has been assigned might even stagger the complacency of CAPTAIN BALFOUR. Central American destinations ; Eastern Airlines is flying across the Caribbean into South America ; United Airlines is spanning the Pacific (to Australia and New Zealand) and PAA (Pan-American An Unjustifiable Hope Airways) continues its established routes beyond the West Coast In the course of his reply to the debate the Under-Secretary and Hawaii. Supplementing this, Pan-American is also flying to endeavoured to comfort us by saying that it is well under­ points in the Caribbean, and covers the South Atlantic and also stood with the Americans that they are acquiring no vested rights flies across Africa to points eastward." (our italics.) " Three large as regards routes they arc now running for military purposes U.S. aircraft manufacturers—Douglas, Curtiss-Wright and Con­ on lines which may have commercial values after the war. This solidated—are currently producing cargo carrying planes at top is, unfortunately, not very convincing and, with the greatest speed, while a fourth—Lockheed—is gearing up for production of respect, we do not think he knew what he was talking about. a four-engine 80,000 lb. monoplane (" Constellation "). " Pooling Our reason for saying so is that' a message from its Washington their experience into one great organization known as ' Air Lines correspondent dated December 28, and published in The Times the War Training ' (the airlines) created a national programme for following day, gives " the principles or policies upon which this schooling pilots, mechanics, flight-engineers and other personnel country (the U.S.A.) will seek to establish an agreement with officers. Financed by the participating airlines themselves, this Britain and other nations to cover the field of commercial flying programme is expected to yield sufficient quantities of pilots, co­ after the war." The third of these reads : " The principle of' free­ pilots, navigators and mechanics to maintain cargo airplanes in dom of the air' meaning that any country could license commercial every combat area, as well as to keep their own passenger services aircraft for commerce between their own country and an}' other or intact." (our italics.) between two or more foreign countries." How about it, CAITAIN BALFOUR ? If wc agree to this, apparently eminently reasonable, proposition, how can we protest against the United States continuing Mass Production of Commercial Types to operate for commercial flying any or all of the services over the As a corollary to, and in confirmation of, these extracts may be routes given in " The Bee-Hive " as in operation by them to-day? quoted a statement issued by the Aeronautical Chamber of Com­ No doubt the British Empire could start services in competition, merce that at the end of September last one-fifth of the multi­ but what chance should we have ? engined production in the United States was allocated to cargo air­ craft and that this proportion was expected to rise to one-third She's Got the Ships . . . during the first half of 1943. The house organ of Pan-American Airways, reporting an address by Major-Gcneral H. L. George, America will have the machines, she will have the ground commanding ATC, forecast American cargo aircraft flying to Europe organization, she will have the trained, experienced personnel. 24 times a day and to Australia and India 20 or 30 times a week. I t is not reasonable to suppose that she will agree immediately at the end of the war to retire and leave all these routes 'without The Obverse air communication during the two or three, or more, years it would take us to get something going. It is not in human nature That is, from the standpoint of British aviation, the reverse side to imagine anything so fantastic ; particularly as, according to one of the coin. Here is the obverse. British Overseas Airways are of the principles to which she is going to invite our agreement, she reported to possess at the present time exactly 100 aeroplanes would be perfectly entitled to continue. (unless some have been withdrawn from operation since these lines

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1943

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off