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Changing perceptions about entrepreneurship and industry-related aspects and fostering innovation skills using a video game

Changing perceptions about entrepreneurship and industry-related aspects and fostering innovation... This study aims to find empirical evidence on how video games can foster innovation skills and change perceptions about entrepreneurship and general aspects related to the industry in Colombia while innovative pedagogical processes in teaching entrepreneurship in higher education.Design/methodology/approachBased on design-based research, serious games (SGs), entrepreneurial education and the innovator DNA framework, the authors collected data from undergraduate students enrolled in two online entrepreneurship courses at a Colombian university. One course is used as a treatment group where students play a video game created for the purpose of this research while the other group is used as control where traditional learning activities are performed. A self-reported method was used on the perceptions of the students after participating in the activities through questionnaires to find differences between the mean scores reported by both groups.FindingsThe results indicate that students who participated in the video game reported a higher fostering of their innovation skills and a broader change in their perception of entrepreneurship and aspects related to the coffee industry, in contrast to the students of the control group.Originality/valueUsing a video game created by EAFIT University in Colombia, this study responds to an identified need for studying the adequate use of SGs in online class contexts and the need of fostering both innovation skills and positive perceptions on entrepreneurship among students. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interactive Technology and Smart Education Emerald Publishing

Changing perceptions about entrepreneurship and industry-related aspects and fostering innovation skills using a video game

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References (60)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1741-5659
DOI
10.1108/itse-10-2020-0220
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study aims to find empirical evidence on how video games can foster innovation skills and change perceptions about entrepreneurship and general aspects related to the industry in Colombia while innovative pedagogical processes in teaching entrepreneurship in higher education.Design/methodology/approachBased on design-based research, serious games (SGs), entrepreneurial education and the innovator DNA framework, the authors collected data from undergraduate students enrolled in two online entrepreneurship courses at a Colombian university. One course is used as a treatment group where students play a video game created for the purpose of this research while the other group is used as control where traditional learning activities are performed. A self-reported method was used on the perceptions of the students after participating in the activities through questionnaires to find differences between the mean scores reported by both groups.FindingsThe results indicate that students who participated in the video game reported a higher fostering of their innovation skills and a broader change in their perception of entrepreneurship and aspects related to the coffee industry, in contrast to the students of the control group.Originality/valueUsing a video game created by EAFIT University in Colombia, this study responds to an identified need for studying the adequate use of SGs in online class contexts and the need of fostering both innovation skills and positive perceptions on entrepreneurship among students.

Journal

Interactive Technology and Smart EducationEmerald Publishing

Published: May 19, 2021

Keywords: Behavior; Higher education; Video games; User studies; Digital learning

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