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Changing paradigms: managed learning environments and Web 2.0

Changing paradigms: managed learning environments and Web 2.0 Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to understand how emerging technologies and Web 2.0 services are transforming the structure of the web and their potential impact on managed learning environments (MLS) and learning content management systems (LCMS). Design/methodology/approach – Innovative Web 2.0 applications are reviewed in the paper to explore how they incorporate a new paradigm, reshaping the web as an electronic platform for social networks, where users share, edit and collaborate on the publication of content. Findings – The paper finds that, in this rapidly changing environment, educators need to consider the implications of these developments for the current design of the LCMS. An emerging generation of users influenced by social networking experiences and empowered to create, publish, appropriate and redistribute content may find the structures of the LCMS traditional and inflexible in contrast with the user‐centered approach of Web 2.0 services. This fundamental shift in the experience of the digital environment in the social world will require innovative solutions, including broad institution‐wide dialogues on the role of organizations in a Web 2.0 environment, innovative approaches to faculty training, a new emphasis on the role of faculty as learners in a rapidly changing environment, and rethinking the underlying architecture of the LCMS model. Research limitations/implications – The recent emergence of these new developments and the essentially fluid nature of these innovations on the web suggest that the conclusions here remain essentially speculative in nature. Originality/value – This paper identifies a critical challenge in the integration of technology into the teaching‐learning environment and the re‐evaluation of the role of a vendor‐specific enterprise LCMS in the design of e‐learning facilities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Campus-Wide Information Systems Emerald Publishing

Changing paradigms: managed learning environments and Web 2.0

Campus-Wide Information Systems , Volume 24 (3): 10 – Jun 26, 2007

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1065-0741
DOI
10.1108/10650740710762185
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to understand how emerging technologies and Web 2.0 services are transforming the structure of the web and their potential impact on managed learning environments (MLS) and learning content management systems (LCMS). Design/methodology/approach – Innovative Web 2.0 applications are reviewed in the paper to explore how they incorporate a new paradigm, reshaping the web as an electronic platform for social networks, where users share, edit and collaborate on the publication of content. Findings – The paper finds that, in this rapidly changing environment, educators need to consider the implications of these developments for the current design of the LCMS. An emerging generation of users influenced by social networking experiences and empowered to create, publish, appropriate and redistribute content may find the structures of the LCMS traditional and inflexible in contrast with the user‐centered approach of Web 2.0 services. This fundamental shift in the experience of the digital environment in the social world will require innovative solutions, including broad institution‐wide dialogues on the role of organizations in a Web 2.0 environment, innovative approaches to faculty training, a new emphasis on the role of faculty as learners in a rapidly changing environment, and rethinking the underlying architecture of the LCMS model. Research limitations/implications – The recent emergence of these new developments and the essentially fluid nature of these innovations on the web suggest that the conclusions here remain essentially speculative in nature. Originality/value – This paper identifies a critical challenge in the integration of technology into the teaching‐learning environment and the re‐evaluation of the role of a vendor‐specific enterprise LCMS in the design of e‐learning facilities.

Journal

Campus-Wide Information SystemsEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 26, 2007

Keywords: Learning methods; Content management; World wide web

References

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