Caterers’ knowledge and attitude towards healthy eating

Caterers’ knowledge and attitude towards healthy eating The typical Scottish diet is high in meat, dairy products and confectionery and low in cereals, vegetables and fresh fruit, although evidence suggests that consumers are becoming more "health" conscious. Research indicates that more people are eating out nowadays and requesting "healthy" choices when doing so. This present study examined, by means of a questionnaire, chefs' knowledge of nutrition and their ability to apply this to recipes. A total of 25 chefs completed the study. Most chefs had received training and had a positive attitude towards "healthy" eating. The changes chefs made to recipes were partly in keeping with current dietary guidelines, particularly for fat and energy. Further research is needed into whether chefs actually know and understand specific dietary guidelines or whether they lack the practical skills needed to prepare "healthy" dishes. It is recommended that college courses should teach chefs "healthy" eating theory reinforced by practical skills. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition & Food Science Emerald Publishing

Caterers’ knowledge and attitude towards healthy eating

Nutrition & Food Science, Volume 30 (6): 5 – Dec 1, 2000

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0034-6659
DOI
10.1108/00346650010352834
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The typical Scottish diet is high in meat, dairy products and confectionery and low in cereals, vegetables and fresh fruit, although evidence suggests that consumers are becoming more "health" conscious. Research indicates that more people are eating out nowadays and requesting "healthy" choices when doing so. This present study examined, by means of a questionnaire, chefs' knowledge of nutrition and their ability to apply this to recipes. A total of 25 chefs completed the study. Most chefs had received training and had a positive attitude towards "healthy" eating. The changes chefs made to recipes were partly in keeping with current dietary guidelines, particularly for fat and energy. Further research is needed into whether chefs actually know and understand specific dietary guidelines or whether they lack the practical skills needed to prepare "healthy" dishes. It is recommended that college courses should teach chefs "healthy" eating theory reinforced by practical skills.

Journal

Nutrition & Food ScienceEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2000

Keywords: Training; Diet; Health

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