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Can localised food systems be a silver bullet for some globalised humanitarian problems

Can localised food systems be a silver bullet for some globalised humanitarian problems Purpose Our global food system today is characterised by an unprecedented scale of centralisation, intensification and concentration. The recordhigh food supplies are supposed to suffice the mouths of seven billion and famines become something in history, which is ironically not the case today. The purpose of this paper is to study whether the globalised food system in the current form is sustainable for all and whether the alternatives are available.Designmethodologyapproach The paper will discuss the benefits of, as well as challenges facing, a localised food system. It will also analyse how the Food Empire undermines universal food security and food sovereignty, especially the way the underprivileged in the south are being exploited.Findings Created by several transnational corporations, the Food Empire dominates the global agrifood industry, from agricultural inputs to food retails, under intensive globalisation of agriproduction and liberalisation of international trade. Instead of a globalised food system, this paper argues that it is better to have localised food systems as they can offer people an equitable access to food and ensure longterm productivity of our farmlands as part of the agenda for sustainable development.Originalityvalue We have to review trade rules and stop the food war against nature, the poor and justice. Free market and green revolution in which many believe are not whole of the answers to achieve a sustainable food system, but only the political will to change the way food is produced and consumed from now on. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Education and Development Studies Emerald Publishing

Can localised food systems be a silver bullet for some globalised humanitarian problems

Asian Education and Development Studies , Volume 1 (2): 21 – May 25, 2012

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2046-3162
DOI
10.1108/20463161211240142
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose Our global food system today is characterised by an unprecedented scale of centralisation, intensification and concentration. The recordhigh food supplies are supposed to suffice the mouths of seven billion and famines become something in history, which is ironically not the case today. The purpose of this paper is to study whether the globalised food system in the current form is sustainable for all and whether the alternatives are available.Designmethodologyapproach The paper will discuss the benefits of, as well as challenges facing, a localised food system. It will also analyse how the Food Empire undermines universal food security and food sovereignty, especially the way the underprivileged in the south are being exploited.Findings Created by several transnational corporations, the Food Empire dominates the global agrifood industry, from agricultural inputs to food retails, under intensive globalisation of agriproduction and liberalisation of international trade. Instead of a globalised food system, this paper argues that it is better to have localised food systems as they can offer people an equitable access to food and ensure longterm productivity of our farmlands as part of the agenda for sustainable development.Originalityvalue We have to review trade rules and stop the food war against nature, the poor and justice. Free market and green revolution in which many believe are not whole of the answers to achieve a sustainable food system, but only the political will to change the way food is produced and consumed from now on.

Journal

Asian Education and Development StudiesEmerald Publishing

Published: May 25, 2012

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