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British Standard Specifications

British Standard Specifications Workshop and Production Section AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G October, 1940 The composition clause has been so framed that be engraved and, in a n appendix, some recommend­ Spanish Handbook on British Industrial a n arsenical copper can be provided under the ation s are made in regard to the suitable dimensions Practice specification if desired. The tensile strength of the for the cross-sections of the beams. Th e British Standards Institution is engaged on material is 17 to 21 tons/sq. in. for half-hard The specification for slip (or block) gauges deals th e compilation of a technical handbook in the material and 13·5 to 17 tons/sq. in. for annealed with the parallel-faced type of gauge first intro­ Spanish language, the object of which is to make material , in thicknesses from 3 s.w.g. (0·252 in.) and duced by C. H. Johansson and now manufactured known to prospective purchasers in South America thinner, and in widths up to 42 in. in Great Britain. The principal matters dealt with wha t British industry has to offer. It will also bring in this specification are the series and sizes of the Price 2s. 3d. post free. British industrial practice prominently to the atten­ most frequently used sets, the general dimensions tion of importers, salesmen, young engineers and of the gauges, hardness and accuracy of size. As B.S.S. Nos. 897, 898, 900, 901.—For Leaded Gun- others, and correct an y misapprehension which may regards the latter, requirements are laid down for metal Castings and Ingots. exist regarding the competitive character of British standard s of accuracy for three grades of gauges, There has in the past been a standard for only goods and their suitability to those markets. namel y workshop, inspection, and calibration. one typ e of gun-metal alloy namely :— Th e British Council is lending its full support to The specification also deals with the essential 88/10/ 2 (copper, tin, zinc) bronze (gun-metal) thi s effort and will assist in giving publicity to requirement s of the accessories commonly used ingots and castings (B.S. 381 and 382). th e handbook and in furthering its distribution with slip gauges, namely measuring jaws, scribing The British Standards Institution has, however, throughou t the whole of South America. and centre points, holders and bases. An appendix jus t issued standards for two further leaded gun- A Committee of Direction, under the chairman­ gives helpful information on the care and use of metal alloys of the compositions 85/5/5/5 and ship of Dr. T. Swinden, of the United Steel Com­ slip gauges in the workshop and test room. 87/9/3/ 1 respectively. They form the subject of panies Ltd., and composed of a number of experts, Pric e 2s. each (2s. 2d. post free). tw o publications each of which includes separate which was set up to examine the project, unani­ specifications for ingots and castings and the form mously decided that the handbook should cover all of the specifications follows the lines previously thos e branches of industry interested in South B.S.S. No. 904—Dimensions of Instrument Jewels. established for the bronze gun-metal castings American trade. It will be the forerunner of other specifications. This specification was prepared in response to a volumes dealing in far greater detail with individual request received from the Air Ministry. It applies The specifications have been based on proposals industries, which will be undertaken at a later date to compass jewels and to "V " jewels and ring pu t forward by the Institute of British Foundrymen when the technical staffs are able to turn their an d end stones for instruments other than watches as a result of a considerable amount of experimental attentio n from matters relating to the war effort. an d clocks and integrating meters. work which was carried out by one of their com­ A supplement to the handbook is being pre­ The principal object of this standardization has mittees . It may be interesting to state that the pare d which will give British exporters an oppor­ been the simplification of a wide diversity of sizes specifications only provide for test pieces to be tunit y of bringing to the notice of South America an d types of instrument jewels. separatel y cast, either in the moulds of the same throug h textual and display advertisements their materials as those used for the castings represented, Th e overall dimensions and tolerances are given own particular products. The supplement will be or in chilled castings. The tensile strength of the for a limited number of sizes of jewels of each type, given away with each copy of the handbook sold. 85/5/5/ 5 alloy is 12 tons/sq. in. and that of the together with particulars of the form of the hole The B.S.I. has circularized trade organizations and 87/9/3/ 1 alloy is 14 tons/sq. in. or recess. The concentration of manufacture and expor t groups likely to be interested, but any deman d on these limited types and sizes will, it is Price, B.S.S. 897 and 898, (in one volume) and individual firms who have not up to the present confidently anticipated, considerably expedite jewel B.S.S 900 and 901 (in one volume), 2s. 3d. each received details of the project, if interested, are productio n in this country. volume. invited to communicate with the Institution at The appendix to the specification gives notes on 28 Victoria Street, London, S.W.1 alternativ e methods of inspecting jewels with B.S.S. No. 382.—88/10/2 Bronze (gun metal) for general engineering purposes. particula r reference to the general form and angle of the recess. Copies of the following specifications may be Price 2s. 3d., post free. B.S.S. No. 383.—88/10/2 Bronze (gun metal) sand obtained, at the price indicated, from the British and chilled castings for general engineering Standards Institution, 28 Victoria Street, London, purposes. S.W.I. B.S.S. No. 905.—Anti-interference Characteristics Th e British Standards Institution has recently and Performance of Radio-receiving Equip­ Revised British Standard Specifications for Copper been engaged in a revision of a number of ment. Alloy Bars specifications for non-ferrous metals, and among Revised specifications have just been issued for those revised which have just been published are th e following : th e above. B.S.S. No. 613.—Components for Radio-interference B.S.S. 218. Brass Bars and Sections, suitable for The principal alterations that have been the Suppression Devices (Excluding Devices for subject of the revision are the manner in which the Forgings and Drop Forgings. Traction, Marine and Other Special Equipment). tes t piece is taken and the inclusion of chilled B.S.S. 249. Brass Bars (High-Speed Screwing and B.S.S. 905 is a new specification while B.S.S. 613 castings within the scope of the standard. Turning) . is revised, which makes the total dealing with the B.S.S. 250. High-Tensile Brass Bars and Sections. Th e specification for gun-metal castings will now subject of radio interference six. The former B.S.S. 251. Naval Brass (Admiralty Mixture) Bars supersede 2.B.2. of the aircraft series which will prescribes the general conditions to be complied shortl y be withdrawn. an d Sections. with in th e design of radio-receiving equipment, and Pric e 2s. 3d. each, post free. B.S.S. 252. Naval Brass (Special Mixture) Bars gives guidance on the method of installing such an d Sections. equipmen t and interference suppression devices with B.S.S. 369. Phosphor Bronze Bars or Rods for B.S.S. No. 885.—Hard Drawn Seamless Brass th e object of minimizing the effects of radio inter­ General Purposes. Tubes; Ultimate Tensile Stress 25 to 35 tons ference. While it is of importance to the makers of Th e revision has been effected to bring these per sq. in. radio receivers the specification is also of particular specifications up to date, and there are two out­ interest to the users of receivers, as it helps them standin g features. The first is tha t Standards 218, B.S.S. No. 886.—Annealed Seamless Brass Tubes. to help themselves in the elimination of inter­ 251 and 252 have been amplified by the addition ference emanating from sources beyond their These specifications form part of a series of of a separate section to provide for forgings. The control, Some pertinent remarks are made about British Standards for non-ferrous metal and alloys othe r is th e fact tha t the revised specifications now inefficient aerials and a section is devoted to the an d were drawn up as a result of a request from supersede the following aircraft specifications in characteristics and performance of "anti-inter­ th e Air Ministry and the Society of British Aircraft th e B series: ference " aerial systems. Another section deals with Constructors for a specification of more general 3 B 1 High-Tensile Brass Bars. communit y aerials specially designed to permit the applicability than those a t present in use. 3 B 6 Naval Brass Bars. simultaneous operation of two or more receivers Price 2s. (2s. 2d. post free). 3 B 11 Brass Bars suitable to be Brazed or Silver from the same aerial. The methods of eliminating Soldered. radi o interference from the electric supply mains 3 B 13 Brass Bars (High-Speed Screwing and B.S.S. No. 887.—Vernier Calipers. and means of protection against atmospheric Turning) . electricity are described. DT D 78 Phosphor-Bronze Bars. B.S.S. No. 888.—Slip (or Block) Gauges. Th e reference to marine equipment as one of the Copies of the revised standards cost 2s. 3d. each These are two new specifications recently issued items excluded from the scope of B.S.S. 613 is pos t free (12s. 6d. for the set of 6 publications). in the series of British Standards for engineers significant and we understand that a separate precision tools. specification dealing with the suppression of radio B.S.S. No. 899.—Cold-Rolled Copper Sheet. Th e specification for vernier callipers docs not interference on board ship is in course of prepara­ I t is rather surprising that so far there has been attemp t to impose restrictions in regard to details tion. The new edition of B.S.S. 613 differs some­ no British Standard Specification for copper for of design, but, like the other specifications in this wha t as regards details, particularly in the section general engineering purposes, although there is a series, is mainly concerned with prescribing limits relating t o capacitors . It is, however, in the appen­ useful series of specifications for copper for elec­ of error. It relates to callipers in inch and metric dices that the main interest of the specification trical purposes. measures in seven standard sizes, the largest of lies. Two entirely new appendices have been This deficiency has now been made good and a which read up to 48 in. and 1 metre respectively. added , dealing respectively with shock and earth- British Standard for cold-rolled copper sheet and Six types of verniers are described reading to leakage considerations and with wiring and main­ strip (half-hard and annealed) for general engineer­ 0.001 in. and 0.01 mm. The specification gives tenance . The appendix giving suggested values of ing purposes has now been published. This permissible errors in the readings over the range component s for various types of suppressors has specification supersedes that which existed of each size of calliper and also prescribes the flat­ been extended and revised in the light of the in the aircraft series—B.S.S. 2 B.15—for copper ness and straightness of the beam and the flatness experience gained since the first edition of the sheets for aircraft purposes, and which will now be an d squareness of the measuring jaws. Details are specification was published. withdrawn. given of the manner in which the graduation should Price 2s. 3d. each, post free. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

British Standard Specifications

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 12 (10): 1 – Oct 1, 1940

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Emerald Publishing
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0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030706
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Abstract

Workshop and Production Section AIRCRAFT ENGINEERIN G October, 1940 The composition clause has been so framed that be engraved and, in a n appendix, some recommend­ Spanish Handbook on British Industrial a n arsenical copper can be provided under the ation s are made in regard to the suitable dimensions Practice specification if desired. The tensile strength of the for the cross-sections of the beams. Th e British Standards Institution is engaged on material is 17 to 21 tons/sq. in. for half-hard The specification for slip (or block) gauges deals th e compilation of a technical handbook in the material and 13·5 to 17 tons/sq. in. for annealed with the parallel-faced type of gauge first intro­ Spanish language, the object of which is to make material , in thicknesses from 3 s.w.g. (0·252 in.) and duced by C. H. Johansson and now manufactured known to prospective purchasers in South America thinner, and in widths up to 42 in. in Great Britain. The principal matters dealt with wha t British industry has to offer. It will also bring in this specification are the series and sizes of the Price 2s. 3d. post free. British industrial practice prominently to the atten­ most frequently used sets, the general dimensions tion of importers, salesmen, young engineers and of the gauges, hardness and accuracy of size. As B.S.S. Nos. 897, 898, 900, 901.—For Leaded Gun- others, and correct an y misapprehension which may regards the latter, requirements are laid down for metal Castings and Ingots. exist regarding the competitive character of British standard s of accuracy for three grades of gauges, There has in the past been a standard for only goods and their suitability to those markets. namel y workshop, inspection, and calibration. one typ e of gun-metal alloy namely :— Th e British Council is lending its full support to The specification also deals with the essential 88/10/ 2 (copper, tin, zinc) bronze (gun-metal) thi s effort and will assist in giving publicity to requirement s of the accessories commonly used ingots and castings (B.S. 381 and 382). th e handbook and in furthering its distribution with slip gauges, namely measuring jaws, scribing The British Standards Institution has, however, throughou t the whole of South America. and centre points, holders and bases. An appendix jus t issued standards for two further leaded gun- A Committee of Direction, under the chairman­ gives helpful information on the care and use of metal alloys of the compositions 85/5/5/5 and ship of Dr. T. Swinden, of the United Steel Com­ slip gauges in the workshop and test room. 87/9/3/ 1 respectively. They form the subject of panies Ltd., and composed of a number of experts, Pric e 2s. each (2s. 2d. post free). tw o publications each of which includes separate which was set up to examine the project, unani­ specifications for ingots and castings and the form mously decided that the handbook should cover all of the specifications follows the lines previously thos e branches of industry interested in South B.S.S. No. 904—Dimensions of Instrument Jewels. established for the bronze gun-metal castings American trade. It will be the forerunner of other specifications. This specification was prepared in response to a volumes dealing in far greater detail with individual request received from the Air Ministry. It applies The specifications have been based on proposals industries, which will be undertaken at a later date to compass jewels and to "V " jewels and ring pu t forward by the Institute of British Foundrymen when the technical staffs are able to turn their an d end stones for instruments other than watches as a result of a considerable amount of experimental attentio n from matters relating to the war effort. an d clocks and integrating meters. work which was carried out by one of their com­ A supplement to the handbook is being pre­ The principal object of this standardization has mittees . It may be interesting to state that the pare d which will give British exporters an oppor­ been the simplification of a wide diversity of sizes specifications only provide for test pieces to be tunit y of bringing to the notice of South America an d types of instrument jewels. separatel y cast, either in the moulds of the same throug h textual and display advertisements their materials as those used for the castings represented, Th e overall dimensions and tolerances are given own particular products. The supplement will be or in chilled castings. The tensile strength of the for a limited number of sizes of jewels of each type, given away with each copy of the handbook sold. 85/5/5/ 5 alloy is 12 tons/sq. in. and that of the together with particulars of the form of the hole The B.S.I. has circularized trade organizations and 87/9/3/ 1 alloy is 14 tons/sq. in. or recess. The concentration of manufacture and expor t groups likely to be interested, but any deman d on these limited types and sizes will, it is Price, B.S.S. 897 and 898, (in one volume) and individual firms who have not up to the present confidently anticipated, considerably expedite jewel B.S.S 900 and 901 (in one volume), 2s. 3d. each received details of the project, if interested, are productio n in this country. volume. invited to communicate with the Institution at The appendix to the specification gives notes on 28 Victoria Street, London, S.W.1 alternativ e methods of inspecting jewels with B.S.S. No. 382.—88/10/2 Bronze (gun metal) for general engineering purposes. particula r reference to the general form and angle of the recess. Copies of the following specifications may be Price 2s. 3d., post free. B.S.S. No. 383.—88/10/2 Bronze (gun metal) sand obtained, at the price indicated, from the British and chilled castings for general engineering Standards Institution, 28 Victoria Street, London, purposes. S.W.I. B.S.S. No. 905.—Anti-interference Characteristics Th e British Standards Institution has recently and Performance of Radio-receiving Equip­ Revised British Standard Specifications for Copper been engaged in a revision of a number of ment. Alloy Bars specifications for non-ferrous metals, and among Revised specifications have just been issued for those revised which have just been published are th e following : th e above. B.S.S. No. 613.—Components for Radio-interference B.S.S. 218. Brass Bars and Sections, suitable for The principal alterations that have been the Suppression Devices (Excluding Devices for subject of the revision are the manner in which the Forgings and Drop Forgings. Traction, Marine and Other Special Equipment). tes t piece is taken and the inclusion of chilled B.S.S. 249. Brass Bars (High-Speed Screwing and B.S.S. 905 is a new specification while B.S.S. 613 castings within the scope of the standard. Turning) . is revised, which makes the total dealing with the B.S.S. 250. High-Tensile Brass Bars and Sections. Th e specification for gun-metal castings will now subject of radio interference six. The former B.S.S. 251. Naval Brass (Admiralty Mixture) Bars supersede 2.B.2. of the aircraft series which will prescribes the general conditions to be complied shortl y be withdrawn. an d Sections. with in th e design of radio-receiving equipment, and Pric e 2s. 3d. each, post free. B.S.S. 252. Naval Brass (Special Mixture) Bars gives guidance on the method of installing such an d Sections. equipmen t and interference suppression devices with B.S.S. 369. Phosphor Bronze Bars or Rods for B.S.S. No. 885.—Hard Drawn Seamless Brass th e object of minimizing the effects of radio inter­ General Purposes. Tubes; Ultimate Tensile Stress 25 to 35 tons ference. While it is of importance to the makers of Th e revision has been effected to bring these per sq. in. radio receivers the specification is also of particular specifications up to date, and there are two out­ interest to the users of receivers, as it helps them standin g features. The first is tha t Standards 218, B.S.S. No. 886.—Annealed Seamless Brass Tubes. to help themselves in the elimination of inter­ 251 and 252 have been amplified by the addition ference emanating from sources beyond their These specifications form part of a series of of a separate section to provide for forgings. The control, Some pertinent remarks are made about British Standards for non-ferrous metal and alloys othe r is th e fact tha t the revised specifications now inefficient aerials and a section is devoted to the an d were drawn up as a result of a request from supersede the following aircraft specifications in characteristics and performance of "anti-inter­ th e Air Ministry and the Society of British Aircraft th e B series: ference " aerial systems. Another section deals with Constructors for a specification of more general 3 B 1 High-Tensile Brass Bars. communit y aerials specially designed to permit the applicability than those a t present in use. 3 B 6 Naval Brass Bars. simultaneous operation of two or more receivers Price 2s. (2s. 2d. post free). 3 B 11 Brass Bars suitable to be Brazed or Silver from the same aerial. The methods of eliminating Soldered. radi o interference from the electric supply mains 3 B 13 Brass Bars (High-Speed Screwing and B.S.S. No. 887.—Vernier Calipers. and means of protection against atmospheric Turning) . electricity are described. DT D 78 Phosphor-Bronze Bars. B.S.S. No. 888.—Slip (or Block) Gauges. Th e reference to marine equipment as one of the Copies of the revised standards cost 2s. 3d. each These are two new specifications recently issued items excluded from the scope of B.S.S. 613 is pos t free (12s. 6d. for the set of 6 publications). in the series of British Standards for engineers significant and we understand that a separate precision tools. specification dealing with the suppression of radio B.S.S. No. 899.—Cold-Rolled Copper Sheet. Th e specification for vernier callipers docs not interference on board ship is in course of prepara­ I t is rather surprising that so far there has been attemp t to impose restrictions in regard to details tion. The new edition of B.S.S. 613 differs some­ no British Standard Specification for copper for of design, but, like the other specifications in this wha t as regards details, particularly in the section general engineering purposes, although there is a series, is mainly concerned with prescribing limits relating t o capacitors . It is, however, in the appen­ useful series of specifications for copper for elec­ of error. It relates to callipers in inch and metric dices that the main interest of the specification trical purposes. measures in seven standard sizes, the largest of lies. Two entirely new appendices have been This deficiency has now been made good and a which read up to 48 in. and 1 metre respectively. added , dealing respectively with shock and earth- British Standard for cold-rolled copper sheet and Six types of verniers are described reading to leakage considerations and with wiring and main­ strip (half-hard and annealed) for general engineer­ 0.001 in. and 0.01 mm. The specification gives tenance . The appendix giving suggested values of ing purposes has now been published. This permissible errors in the readings over the range component s for various types of suppressors has specification supersedes that which existed of each size of calliper and also prescribes the flat­ been extended and revised in the light of the in the aircraft series—B.S.S. 2 B.15—for copper ness and straightness of the beam and the flatness experience gained since the first edition of the sheets for aircraft purposes, and which will now be an d squareness of the measuring jaws. Details are specification was published. withdrawn. given of the manner in which the graduation should Price 2s. 3d. each, post free.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 1940

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