British Patent Abridgments

British Patent Abridgments These abstracts of British Patent Specificat ions are con­ vortices between the ground and the air intake. Each densed, by permission, from the official specifications. wing 10 carries an engine pod 12 and a gas discharge Copies of the full specifications are obtainable from the outlet 25 is located in the pod cowling and connected Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, by a duct 29 with a solenoid operated vaive 28 which price 3s. 6d. each. is in communication with a late stage of the com­ pressor of a gas turbine engine. The solenoid of valve 855,980. Aircraft. Douglas Aircraft Co. Inc. Sept. 28 may be energized by a manually operated switch 34 23, 1958. and/or a switch 37 which is closed by contraction of cave surface 11, which may be continuous as shown or the noscwheel undercarriage 40 and by switches 45 formed by a plurality of discontinuous fiat portions, to In order to prevent the entry of debris into the air associated with throttle control levers 47. The air to form with the upper surface of portion 4 a throat intake of je t propulsion plant on aircraft during ground outlet 25 may be supplied by a separate engine driven referred to as a supersonic pressure chamber which running, a jet of pressure air is directed at the ground compressor. In operation, air from outlet 25 strikes the extends into an enlarged combustion chamber 7 below the air intake to prevent the formation of ground 15 below air intake 13 and fans out over the provided with a propulsion nozzle 30. The profile surface of the ground, thereby preventing the forma­ of sufacc 11 is selected to generate an infinite number of tion of vortices between the ground and inlet 13 of shock waves 14, 15, 16, 17, which will intersect a strength capable of raising destructive debris to the principal shock wave 9 generated at beak 8 to in­ level of the air intake. crease its magnitude and deflect it from the leading edge 17 of the portion 4. The pressure rise beneath 856,507. Aircraft Wings and Propulsion Units. surface 11 resulting from the shock waves provides a lifting effect on the aerofoil. A further shock wave 20 General Electric Co. April 21, 1959. from leading edge 17 results in reflexions 21-23 and a A wing for a supersonic aircraft comprises vertically- standing wave 24. This results in a pressure in­ spaced upper and lower portions 5 and 4 which define crease within chamber 7. The illustration is a chord- between them a chamber 7 constituting a ram-jet wise cross-section through an aircraft wing and the propulsion unit. The upper surface of portion 5 is duct may extend throughout the span. Ducts 31 and planar and inclined as shown to the horizontal 10 in 32 are provided to bleed boundary layer air from the flight and the lower surface of portion 5 is substantially lower leading surfaces of portions 5 and 4 and such parallel thereto, the two portions being connected by air may be used to cool the walls of the combustion faired struts 6. The lower surface of portion 5 com­ chamber. mences at a beak 8 and extends rcarwardly in a con­ to the manifold. A squib igniter is centrally disposed in the cover plate. A plurality of rotatablc reaction U.S. Patent Specifications nozzles are connected to the aft section and com­ municate with the manifold. A cable operatively These details are taken by permission of the Depart­ and space from the axis—each of the units comprising connects the nozzles with the cams, whereby the ment of Commerce, from the 'Official Gazette of the a cylindrical shroud having an open inlet end and an turning moment created by the reaction of each United States Patent Office'. Copies of the full speci­ open outlet end—driven impellers mounted for axial nozzle will be in the same direction as the turning fications are obtainable from the Commissioner of rotation therein and a plurality of radially-extending, moment of each tail fin to which it is responsive the Parents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A., price 25 cents each. pivotally mounted vanes in the inlet portion of such unit. Each of the units is mounted for controllable 2,989,272. Aircraft Tail Hook Assembly. B. R. movement about a lateral axis whereby the units may Shcaffer, assignor to All American Engineering Co., be adjusted to direct thrust at any desired angle be­ November 19, 1958. tween horizontal and vertical. Means can be energized An aircraft arresting assembly comprises an arm by the pilot-controlled means for attaining lateral having securing means at one end for securing it to the control of the aircraft by simultaneously and con- underside of an aircraft fuselage, the arm being formed trollably varying the position of ailerons and of the pivoted vanes in the propulsion units. 2,991,961. Jet Aircraft Configuration. F. M. Rogallo, } . M. Riebe, and J. G. Lowry, assignors to the United States of America as represented by the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. May 6, 1959. There are in an aircraft, a fuselage, a wing carried high by the fuselage, a plurality of jet engines arranged in a cluster mounted on the upper surface of the wing, control device is displaced from the boat-tail upon a nacelle enclosing the plurality of jet engines, and a ignition of the booster and thrust against the cover rectangular orifice formed in the nacelle for normally plate. effecting a rearward ejection of the jet exhaust deve­ of a spring bow so that, when secured to an aircraft loped by the jet engines. Means exist adjacent to the fuselage at the one end it will extend downwards. A 2,998,209. Multi-Purpose, Jet Propelled Aircraft. orifice for selectively interrupting the rearward ejec­ hook exists at the end remote from the securing means, R. F. Creasey, B. O. Heath and G. F. Sharpies, as­ tion and for deflecting the direction of flow of the jet and connecting means exist for connecting the hook signors to The English Electric Co. Ltd. September end to the aircraft fuselage. 25, 1959. A multi-purpose aircraft capable of supersonic 2,991,026. Aircraft Flight Control System. N. E. flight at high altitude and of high load-carrying capa­ Nelson and J. B. Reichert, assignors to Doak Air­ city at high subsonic speed at low altitude, comprises craft Co. Inc., June 28, 1956. in combination: a fuselage, a thin profile delta wing In an aircraft, including a wing, normal control sur­ mounted on top the of the fuselage which has large faces comprising elevator, rudder-and ailerons, pilot- blown flaps along the whole free length of its trailing controlled means forcontrollably moving said normal edge, an all-moving two-part tailplane fitted to the control surfaces, and a rcarwardly directed engine fuselage, and twin jet propulsion engines having jet exhaust tail pipe, the provision of a flight ccntrol pipes mounted closely parallel to one another within exhaust, and a trailing edge flap over which the jet system comprises: a thrust-generating propulsion unit the rear portion of the fuselage near the centre line exhaust is directed to flow by the orifice when the on each side of the longitudinal axis of the aircraft of the latter. The jet pipes are located between and flap is in an extended and deflected position. above the two parts of the all-moving tailplanc. 2,995,319. A Prc-Boost Control Device for Aerial Missiles. R. B. Kershner and F. H. Swaim, assignors to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Navy. October 9, 1958. In a pre-boost control device for a low velocity launched missile, the missile has a booster and a boat-tail section. The section includes a plurality of movable tail fins. A forward section is mounted on the boat-tail section and an aft section is mounted in axially spaced relation to the forward section. The sections are interconnected by a plurality of ribs. A plurality of rotatable cams are attached to the forward section and actuated by the tail fins. The aft section is closed by a cover plate to form a combustion manifold. A propellent grain exists within the aft section adjacent 374 Aircraft Engineering http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

British Patent Abridgments

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Volume 33 (12): 1 – Dec 1, 1961

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb033503
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

These abstracts of British Patent Specificat ions are con­ vortices between the ground and the air intake. Each densed, by permission, from the official specifications. wing 10 carries an engine pod 12 and a gas discharge Copies of the full specifications are obtainable from the outlet 25 is located in the pod cowling and connected Patent Office, 25 Southampton Buildings, W.C.2, by a duct 29 with a solenoid operated vaive 28 which price 3s. 6d. each. is in communication with a late stage of the com­ pressor of a gas turbine engine. The solenoid of valve 855,980. Aircraft. Douglas Aircraft Co. Inc. Sept. 28 may be energized by a manually operated switch 34 23, 1958. and/or a switch 37 which is closed by contraction of cave surface 11, which may be continuous as shown or the noscwheel undercarriage 40 and by switches 45 formed by a plurality of discontinuous fiat portions, to In order to prevent the entry of debris into the air associated with throttle control levers 47. The air to form with the upper surface of portion 4 a throat intake of je t propulsion plant on aircraft during ground outlet 25 may be supplied by a separate engine driven referred to as a supersonic pressure chamber which running, a jet of pressure air is directed at the ground compressor. In operation, air from outlet 25 strikes the extends into an enlarged combustion chamber 7 below the air intake to prevent the formation of ground 15 below air intake 13 and fans out over the provided with a propulsion nozzle 30. The profile surface of the ground, thereby preventing the forma­ of sufacc 11 is selected to generate an infinite number of tion of vortices between the ground and inlet 13 of shock waves 14, 15, 16, 17, which will intersect a strength capable of raising destructive debris to the principal shock wave 9 generated at beak 8 to in­ level of the air intake. crease its magnitude and deflect it from the leading edge 17 of the portion 4. The pressure rise beneath 856,507. Aircraft Wings and Propulsion Units. surface 11 resulting from the shock waves provides a lifting effect on the aerofoil. A further shock wave 20 General Electric Co. April 21, 1959. from leading edge 17 results in reflexions 21-23 and a A wing for a supersonic aircraft comprises vertically- standing wave 24. This results in a pressure in­ spaced upper and lower portions 5 and 4 which define crease within chamber 7. The illustration is a chord- between them a chamber 7 constituting a ram-jet wise cross-section through an aircraft wing and the propulsion unit. The upper surface of portion 5 is duct may extend throughout the span. Ducts 31 and planar and inclined as shown to the horizontal 10 in 32 are provided to bleed boundary layer air from the flight and the lower surface of portion 5 is substantially lower leading surfaces of portions 5 and 4 and such parallel thereto, the two portions being connected by air may be used to cool the walls of the combustion faired struts 6. The lower surface of portion 5 com­ chamber. mences at a beak 8 and extends rcarwardly in a con­ to the manifold. A squib igniter is centrally disposed in the cover plate. A plurality of rotatablc reaction U.S. Patent Specifications nozzles are connected to the aft section and com­ municate with the manifold. A cable operatively These details are taken by permission of the Depart­ and space from the axis—each of the units comprising connects the nozzles with the cams, whereby the ment of Commerce, from the 'Official Gazette of the a cylindrical shroud having an open inlet end and an turning moment created by the reaction of each United States Patent Office'. Copies of the full speci­ open outlet end—driven impellers mounted for axial nozzle will be in the same direction as the turning fications are obtainable from the Commissioner of rotation therein and a plurality of radially-extending, moment of each tail fin to which it is responsive the Parents, Washington, D.C., U.S.A., price 25 cents each. pivotally mounted vanes in the inlet portion of such unit. Each of the units is mounted for controllable 2,989,272. Aircraft Tail Hook Assembly. B. R. movement about a lateral axis whereby the units may Shcaffer, assignor to All American Engineering Co., be adjusted to direct thrust at any desired angle be­ November 19, 1958. tween horizontal and vertical. Means can be energized An aircraft arresting assembly comprises an arm by the pilot-controlled means for attaining lateral having securing means at one end for securing it to the control of the aircraft by simultaneously and con- underside of an aircraft fuselage, the arm being formed trollably varying the position of ailerons and of the pivoted vanes in the propulsion units. 2,991,961. Jet Aircraft Configuration. F. M. Rogallo, } . M. Riebe, and J. G. Lowry, assignors to the United States of America as represented by the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. May 6, 1959. There are in an aircraft, a fuselage, a wing carried high by the fuselage, a plurality of jet engines arranged in a cluster mounted on the upper surface of the wing, control device is displaced from the boat-tail upon a nacelle enclosing the plurality of jet engines, and a ignition of the booster and thrust against the cover rectangular orifice formed in the nacelle for normally plate. effecting a rearward ejection of the jet exhaust deve­ of a spring bow so that, when secured to an aircraft loped by the jet engines. Means exist adjacent to the fuselage at the one end it will extend downwards. A 2,998,209. Multi-Purpose, Jet Propelled Aircraft. orifice for selectively interrupting the rearward ejec­ hook exists at the end remote from the securing means, R. F. Creasey, B. O. Heath and G. F. Sharpies, as­ tion and for deflecting the direction of flow of the jet and connecting means exist for connecting the hook signors to The English Electric Co. Ltd. September end to the aircraft fuselage. 25, 1959. A multi-purpose aircraft capable of supersonic 2,991,026. Aircraft Flight Control System. N. E. flight at high altitude and of high load-carrying capa­ Nelson and J. B. Reichert, assignors to Doak Air­ city at high subsonic speed at low altitude, comprises craft Co. Inc., June 28, 1956. in combination: a fuselage, a thin profile delta wing In an aircraft, including a wing, normal control sur­ mounted on top the of the fuselage which has large faces comprising elevator, rudder-and ailerons, pilot- blown flaps along the whole free length of its trailing controlled means forcontrollably moving said normal edge, an all-moving two-part tailplane fitted to the control surfaces, and a rcarwardly directed engine fuselage, and twin jet propulsion engines having jet exhaust tail pipe, the provision of a flight ccntrol pipes mounted closely parallel to one another within exhaust, and a trailing edge flap over which the jet system comprises: a thrust-generating propulsion unit the rear portion of the fuselage near the centre line exhaust is directed to flow by the orifice when the on each side of the longitudinal axis of the aircraft of the latter. The jet pipes are located between and flap is in an extended and deflected position. above the two parts of the all-moving tailplanc. 2,995,319. A Prc-Boost Control Device for Aerial Missiles. R. B. Kershner and F. H. Swaim, assignors to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Navy. October 9, 1958. In a pre-boost control device for a low velocity launched missile, the missile has a booster and a boat-tail section. The section includes a plurality of movable tail fins. A forward section is mounted on the boat-tail section and an aft section is mounted in axially spaced relation to the forward section. The sections are interconnected by a plurality of ribs. A plurality of rotatable cams are attached to the forward section and actuated by the tail fins. The aft section is closed by a cover plate to form a combustion manifold. A propellent grain exists within the aft section adjacent 374 Aircraft Engineering

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1961

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