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British Official Accident Report

British Official Accident Report AIRCRAF T ENGINEERING September, 1939 Resul t of the Investigation into the Loss of the "Challenger" at Mozambique nor did he make use of the appropriate alighting N accident occurred in Mozambique The Inspector's Findings area, but attempted to land directly into wind Harbour, East Africa, on May 1, 1939, As a result of his investigation the inspector straight off his course across the narrow part involving the Empire Flying Boat came to the following conclusions:— of the harbour in order to finish his landing run G-ADVD "Challenger," belonging to Imperial (a) The flying boat was airworthy and at Airways Ltd. Two members of the crew were in the vicinity of the mooring buoys. th e time of the accident was not carrying killed and the remaining four and one of the more than three-quarters of its maximum passengers injured. An investigation was made permissible load. Th e Landing b y an Air Ministry Inspector of Accidents. (b) The weather conditions at the time and On the final approach he operated the throttles place of the accident were excellent. himself and ordered flaps "hal f out " and air­ (c) The commander was competent to fly Circumstances of the Accident screws "fine pitch. " Later he ordered flaps "full this type of aircraft and he was in possession out. " The commander then realized that he The accident occurred when the commander of a current licence. had insufficient length of run to avoid the pier of the flying boat attempted to land in (d) The services provided by the and ordered "flaps in," and himself opened up Mozambique Harbour, a normal port of call. Portuguese Government did not fail. th e throttles to take off again. The engines The "Challenger" approached the alighting (e) The rescue operations after the apparentl y opened up to full power. The area a little behind schedule, flying on a normal accident were carried out with efficiency and flying boat touched the water and bounced into course at a low altitude. The wind was dispatch. th e air to a height of about 10 ft., fell back on W.S.W. The prevailing wind at Mozambique, (f) The accident must be attributed to t o the water, which was so shallow that the which the commander of the flying boat had grave errors of airmanship on the part of the keel struck the bottom, again rose into the air, encountered on each of his previous eight land­ commander of the flying boat. and finally stalled and crashed into 4 ft. of ings at the harbour, is northerly. The com­ The Chief Inspector of Accidents is in water, coming to rest on the sea bottom. mander did not make a circuit of the harbour agreement with the above conclusions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

British Official Accident Report

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 11 (9): 1 – Sep 1, 1939

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb030541
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AIRCRAF T ENGINEERING September, 1939 Resul t of the Investigation into the Loss of the "Challenger" at Mozambique nor did he make use of the appropriate alighting N accident occurred in Mozambique The Inspector's Findings area, but attempted to land directly into wind Harbour, East Africa, on May 1, 1939, As a result of his investigation the inspector straight off his course across the narrow part involving the Empire Flying Boat came to the following conclusions:— of the harbour in order to finish his landing run G-ADVD "Challenger," belonging to Imperial (a) The flying boat was airworthy and at Airways Ltd. Two members of the crew were in the vicinity of the mooring buoys. th e time of the accident was not carrying killed and the remaining four and one of the more than three-quarters of its maximum passengers injured. An investigation was made permissible load. Th e Landing b y an Air Ministry Inspector of Accidents. (b) The weather conditions at the time and On the final approach he operated the throttles place of the accident were excellent. himself and ordered flaps "hal f out " and air­ (c) The commander was competent to fly Circumstances of the Accident screws "fine pitch. " Later he ordered flaps "full this type of aircraft and he was in possession out. " The commander then realized that he The accident occurred when the commander of a current licence. had insufficient length of run to avoid the pier of the flying boat attempted to land in (d) The services provided by the and ordered "flaps in," and himself opened up Mozambique Harbour, a normal port of call. Portuguese Government did not fail. th e throttles to take off again. The engines The "Challenger" approached the alighting (e) The rescue operations after the apparentl y opened up to full power. The area a little behind schedule, flying on a normal accident were carried out with efficiency and flying boat touched the water and bounced into course at a low altitude. The wind was dispatch. th e air to a height of about 10 ft., fell back on W.S.W. The prevailing wind at Mozambique, (f) The accident must be attributed to t o the water, which was so shallow that the which the commander of the flying boat had grave errors of airmanship on the part of the keel struck the bottom, again rose into the air, encountered on each of his previous eight land­ commander of the flying boat. and finally stalled and crashed into 4 ft. of ings at the harbour, is northerly. The com­ The Chief Inspector of Accidents is in water, coming to rest on the sea bottom. mander did not make a circuit of the harbour agreement with the above conclusions.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1939

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