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British Food Journal Volume 77 Issue 1 1975

British Food Journal Volume 77 Issue 1 1975 In these days of jargon and slang, to the purist it must seem that little is described by its real name, that is, during conversation. Most people refer to the city as the smoke and the citydweller's pseudonym for the country is out in the sticks, which, of course, could mean that the sticks are kindling to a fire that has not been lit, with the city smoke as the endproduct of the fire that is burning up those who rush hither and thither in its bedlamite streets and ugly office blocks. The cottage, the church and inn no longer completely fill the lives of the villagers they now have piped water supplies, electricity and telephones deep freezers, colour television and cars they have moved closer to the city standards of comfort and convenience without losing any of the enduring qualities which make them different. And the countryman is very different to the towndwellerin outlook, habit and countenance. Even the villager who works in the town and city, and nowadays there are many of them, would not change his home in the country for a flat or terrace house in a mean street, despite the long journeying to and fro. At one time, it had to be a special type of girl who chose a home in these rural settings, with few or perhaps no neighbours and no cornershop, but now more and more are realizing that life in a village is easier on the whole family. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Food Journal Emerald Publishing

British Food Journal Volume 77 Issue 1 1975

British Food Journal , Volume 77 (1): 32 – Jan 1, 1975

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0007-070X
DOI
10.1108/eb011702
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In these days of jargon and slang, to the purist it must seem that little is described by its real name, that is, during conversation. Most people refer to the city as the smoke and the citydweller's pseudonym for the country is out in the sticks, which, of course, could mean that the sticks are kindling to a fire that has not been lit, with the city smoke as the endproduct of the fire that is burning up those who rush hither and thither in its bedlamite streets and ugly office blocks. The cottage, the church and inn no longer completely fill the lives of the villagers they now have piped water supplies, electricity and telephones deep freezers, colour television and cars they have moved closer to the city standards of comfort and convenience without losing any of the enduring qualities which make them different. And the countryman is very different to the towndwellerin outlook, habit and countenance. Even the villager who works in the town and city, and nowadays there are many of them, would not change his home in the country for a flat or terrace house in a mean street, despite the long journeying to and fro. At one time, it had to be a special type of girl who chose a home in these rural settings, with few or perhaps no neighbours and no cornershop, but now more and more are realizing that life in a village is easier on the whole family.

Journal

British Food JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1975

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