Bridging social distance in inter‐cultural negotiations: “you” and the bi‐cultural negotiator

Bridging social distance in inter‐cultural negotiations: “you” and the bi‐cultural... Purpose – In this study of Korean and US negotiators, the authors aim to demonstrate limits on the presumption that inter‐cultural negotiations are doomed to generate low joint gains. Design/methodology/approach – In a laboratory study with 45 bi‐cultural Korean students and 47 mono‐cultural American students, the authors created a total of 16 US‐US, 15 Korean‐Korean, and 15 US‐Korean dyads. The authors audio‐recorded their negotiation conversations and analyzed the content of the negotiation transcripts. The authors focused on the use of pronouns and coded how they were used and the impact this use had on the outcomes of the intra‐ and inter‐cultural negotiations. Findings – Results show that inter‐cultural dyads generate higher joint gains than Korean or US intra‐cultural dyads. The explanation based on social awareness and social distance theorizing shows that inter‐cultural negotiators, one of whom is bi‐cultural, who use language, especially the pronoun “you” to close social distance, achieve higher joint gains than intra‐cultural negotiators who do not. Research limitations/implications – The authors conclude that the language people use in social interaction, especially pronouns, is an indicator of social awareness and signals attempts to close social distance. Originality/value – This research demonstrates that the way negotiators use language predicts their economic outcomes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Conflict Management Emerald Publishing

Bridging social distance in inter‐cultural negotiations: “you” and the bi‐cultural negotiator

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1044-4068
D.O.I.
10.1108/10444061211218294
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – In this study of Korean and US negotiators, the authors aim to demonstrate limits on the presumption that inter‐cultural negotiations are doomed to generate low joint gains. Design/methodology/approach – In a laboratory study with 45 bi‐cultural Korean students and 47 mono‐cultural American students, the authors created a total of 16 US‐US, 15 Korean‐Korean, and 15 US‐Korean dyads. The authors audio‐recorded their negotiation conversations and analyzed the content of the negotiation transcripts. The authors focused on the use of pronouns and coded how they were used and the impact this use had on the outcomes of the intra‐ and inter‐cultural negotiations. Findings – Results show that inter‐cultural dyads generate higher joint gains than Korean or US intra‐cultural dyads. The explanation based on social awareness and social distance theorizing shows that inter‐cultural negotiators, one of whom is bi‐cultural, who use language, especially the pronoun “you” to close social distance, achieve higher joint gains than intra‐cultural negotiators who do not. Research limitations/implications – The authors conclude that the language people use in social interaction, especially pronouns, is an indicator of social awareness and signals attempts to close social distance. Originality/value – This research demonstrates that the way negotiators use language predicts their economic outcomes.

Journal

International Journal of Conflict ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 20, 2012

Keywords: Culture and negotiation; Social distance; Bi‐cultural; Language; Pronouns; Culture (sociology); Negotiating

References

  • Culture and negotiation strategy
    Adair, W.L.; Brett, J.M.; Lempereur, A.; Okumura, T.; Shikhirev, P.; Tinsley, C.H.; Lytle, A.
  • Culture and joint gains in negotiation
    Brett, J.M.; Adair, W.L.; Lempereur, A.; Okumura, T.; Shikhirev, P.; Tinsley, C.H.; Lytle, A.
  • Determinants of complexity in Mexican‐American and Anglo‐American mothers' conceptions of child development
    Gutierrez, J.; Sameroff, A.
  • Cultural identity and dynamic construction of the self: collective duties and individual rights in Chinese and American cultures
    Hong, Y.; Ip, G.; Chiu, C.; Morris, M.W.; Menon, T.
  • English generic we, you and they: an analysis in terms of territory of information
    Kamio, A.
  • The long and short routes to success in electronically‐mediated negotiations: group affiliations and good vibrations
    Moore, D.A.; Kurtzberg, T.R.; Thompson, L.L.; Morris, M.W.
  • The process of negotiating: strategy and timing as predictors of outcomes
    Olekalns, M.; Smith, P.L.; Walsh, T.
  • Words are all I have: linguistic cues as predictors of settlement in divorce mediation
    Olekalns, M.; Brett, J.M.; Donohue, W.
  • Linguistic style matching and negotiation outcome
    Taylor, P.J.; Thomas, S.

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