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Books Recently Received

Books Recently Received December, 1933 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING 289 A n Important Book Containing a Complete Guide to the Theor y and Practice of Welding who have found welded engine mountings Technique of Modern Welding. By P. loss of ductility and strength can be restored by unsatisfactory, there is no doubt that the Bardtke . Translated by Harold Kenney. hea t treatment only to an extremely limited general experience of welded engine mountings, (Blackie. 15s.) extent . The chapters devoted to are welding, though particularly on civil aeroplanes, is extremely The author of this work has produced in a no t at the present time of more than passing good, and would tend to bear out the author's single volume a most complete exposition of interest to the aeroplane constructor, give a conclusions. the theory and practice of modern welding. very full and complete description of the This is a book which may be fully recom­ He is the works manager of the German State Railway Repair Shops, and the book impresses latest practice both in plant, materials and mended to all engaged in the design and one as being a practical statement of experience methods, and examples given more than production of welded engineering products. as well as a theoretical treatise. indicate the tremendous savings in weight and One hopes tha t in a later edition the subject of cost which are being obtained in the manu­ "Light-Allo y Welding" will receive more Nearly forty pages are devoted to the con­ facture of a great diversity of engineering prac­ attention . Apart from this the author is to sideration of gas welding plant and apparatus, tice. So much so that one would almost be congratulated upon the production of a and the pros and cons of various generating suggest that the aeroplane designer should most comprehensive treatise. methods are fully discussed in this chapter (2) investigate this process as an alternative to which is well worth serious consideration by W. G. G. th e massive "machined from solid" details those responsible for the purchase and instal­ Th e Air Transport Manual. Issued by which assist in making aeroplane construction lation of new plant. In particular the selection The Commercial Motor. (Temple Press. expensive. of the best type of generator for particular 3s. 6d.) factory circumstances would be much aided The aeroplane constructor will read with more by a complete study of this chapter. interest the chapters on "Pressure and Spot This is a useful book, giving details of air Electric Welding." Recent developments in transpor t companies operating in Great Britain, The author's views as to the utility of the th e technique of this type of welding suggest chemical purification of acetylene gas, although type s of aeroplanes and engines used, aero­ tha t even with light alloys it will soon be well backed by research test and confirmed by dromes, etc., with chapters on formalities and possible largely to eliminate riveting as a practical experience, are unlikely to find much regulations and notes on the requirement of method of jointing plates and thin-walled favour with the British Air Ministry. th e law in regard to maintenance. A very tubes, etc. complete list of suppliers of various accessories An examination of the German Homo Office is given at the end. The latest machines eliminate the personal regulations affecting the use of acetylene welding element, and automatic control of pressures, apparatu s would suggest that they are more current intensities, and welding times is em­ stringent than those obtaining in this country; Key Words to the Metallurgy of Steel. possibly on the assumption that it is better to bodied in the machine. The author, however, B y G. A . de Beli n and E . E . G. Bradbury. demand 100 per cent perfection and get emphasizes a point not generally stressed by (Greening & Thompson, Sheffield. 6d.) 75 per cent, than to ask for 75 per cent and th e makers of "spot " welding machines—that This little book is a glossary of metallurgical get 50 per cent. th e savings of spot welding compared with term s for the operator in the machine shop and riveting are seriously affected by the cost of Considerable space is devoted to considera­ others interested . The definitions are couched th e spot welding machine, and can only be tions which should guide the engineer in in simple, as far as possible non-technical, realised on high production. designing for welding, and a numbe r of examples language. It seems admirably to fulfil the are given showing the distortion and internal No book of this kind would be complete purpose for which it is intended and should stresses which may be set up by unskilled withou t a chapter on "testing'" and this prove very useful. location of welds i n th e design stage. One feels section is well u p to th e general standard of the justified in repeating for the benefit of aero­ work. Britis h Standard Engineering Drawing plane designers in general the following sen­ The author's attempts to test by means of Office Practice. (British Standards Insti­ tence: — th e American acoustic method were unsuccess­ tution . 2s.) ful—experience in this country has proved " At the beginning of the design of the This pamphlet embodies the recommenda­ construction the designer must pay attention to similar—and after examining other suggested tions of a strong committee of the British making the weld accessible. It must be so and projected methods of testing welds without Standard s Institution made after careful con­ situated that the frame or work can penetrate destruction (including the magnetic, electrical sideration of the advice and remarks of many into the groove, and furthermore that the and hardness tests) he infers that the X-ray firms and associations consulted. Hard and Radiatio n process offers the best solution. welder can work in the most comfortable fast rules are not laid down, bu t the publication position possible since only thus is it possible to The notes on tensile testing of welded joints is obviously a step in the right direction. carry out careful work." merits the attention of test-house inspectors, The extremely well arranged diagrams, show­ and attention is drawn to the pitfalls which Britis h Standard Nomenclature. Defini­ atten d the tensile testing of welded joints on ing the types of welds approved and symbolised tion s and Symbols for Welding and account of the "Zonal " character of all welds. by the Welding Committee of the Association Gutting . (British Standard s Institution . 2s.) of German Engineers, are recommended to the The autho r suggests tha t the determination of attention of drawing office heads—the draughts­ elongation of weld-metal during tensile tests An authoritative glossary of welding and man designer is too frequently content to must be a laboratory process if the conclusions cuttin g terms which is in effect a guide to the indicate "welding" without specifying the ar e to be of value. subject. It is very fully illustrated. particular kind of welding he requires. A useful bend test apparatus for workshop Equall y useful are the shop hints given to and view-room use is described and illustrated A n Introduction to Aerodynamics. By on page 250, and this tool might well be assist in avoidance of buckling and distortion R.Poole . (Draughtsman Publishing Co. 2s.) standardized for routine tests on welding. by careful consideration of th e tacking clearance One of a scries of pamphlets published for the and jigging arrangements, and the remarks on Methods of microscopical analysis of welds are Association of Engineering and Shipbuilding the necessity for a measure of pre-heating for fully described and the value of this section is Draughtsmen, giving an elementary outline of all heavily stressed welded joints might well be enhanced by the excellent photographic air flow. studied by too zealous rate fixers. enlargements. The aeroplane designer will be particularly The welding of aluminium and its alloys interested in the concluding paragraphs of this receives only passing notice, and one is unable chapte r which deals with the comparison of to agree with the author's statement that fatigue test on equivalent welded and riveted alloys such as duralumin can be satisfactorily welded. Contrary to the views expressed in structures . The results would appear to in­ the book, the general experience in thi s country dicate that the welded structure possesses far is that aluminium alloys with an ultimate greater resistance to fatigue conditions tha n the strength of over 16 tons per square inch give equivalent riveted structure, and although extremely unsatisfactory welds, and that the this may not find favour with those designers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Books Recently Received

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 5 (12): 1 – Dec 1, 1933

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb029750
Publisher site
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Abstract

December, 1933 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING 289 A n Important Book Containing a Complete Guide to the Theor y and Practice of Welding who have found welded engine mountings Technique of Modern Welding. By P. loss of ductility and strength can be restored by unsatisfactory, there is no doubt that the Bardtke . Translated by Harold Kenney. hea t treatment only to an extremely limited general experience of welded engine mountings, (Blackie. 15s.) extent . The chapters devoted to are welding, though particularly on civil aeroplanes, is extremely The author of this work has produced in a no t at the present time of more than passing good, and would tend to bear out the author's single volume a most complete exposition of interest to the aeroplane constructor, give a conclusions. the theory and practice of modern welding. very full and complete description of the This is a book which may be fully recom­ He is the works manager of the German State Railway Repair Shops, and the book impresses latest practice both in plant, materials and mended to all engaged in the design and one as being a practical statement of experience methods, and examples given more than production of welded engineering products. as well as a theoretical treatise. indicate the tremendous savings in weight and One hopes tha t in a later edition the subject of cost which are being obtained in the manu­ "Light-Allo y Welding" will receive more Nearly forty pages are devoted to the con­ facture of a great diversity of engineering prac­ attention . Apart from this the author is to sideration of gas welding plant and apparatus, tice. So much so that one would almost be congratulated upon the production of a and the pros and cons of various generating suggest that the aeroplane designer should most comprehensive treatise. methods are fully discussed in this chapter (2) investigate this process as an alternative to which is well worth serious consideration by W. G. G. th e massive "machined from solid" details those responsible for the purchase and instal­ Th e Air Transport Manual. Issued by which assist in making aeroplane construction lation of new plant. In particular the selection The Commercial Motor. (Temple Press. expensive. of the best type of generator for particular 3s. 6d.) factory circumstances would be much aided The aeroplane constructor will read with more by a complete study of this chapter. interest the chapters on "Pressure and Spot This is a useful book, giving details of air Electric Welding." Recent developments in transpor t companies operating in Great Britain, The author's views as to the utility of the th e technique of this type of welding suggest chemical purification of acetylene gas, although type s of aeroplanes and engines used, aero­ tha t even with light alloys it will soon be well backed by research test and confirmed by dromes, etc., with chapters on formalities and possible largely to eliminate riveting as a practical experience, are unlikely to find much regulations and notes on the requirement of method of jointing plates and thin-walled favour with the British Air Ministry. th e law in regard to maintenance. A very tubes, etc. complete list of suppliers of various accessories An examination of the German Homo Office is given at the end. The latest machines eliminate the personal regulations affecting the use of acetylene welding element, and automatic control of pressures, apparatu s would suggest that they are more current intensities, and welding times is em­ stringent than those obtaining in this country; Key Words to the Metallurgy of Steel. possibly on the assumption that it is better to bodied in the machine. The author, however, B y G. A . de Beli n and E . E . G. Bradbury. demand 100 per cent perfection and get emphasizes a point not generally stressed by (Greening & Thompson, Sheffield. 6d.) 75 per cent, than to ask for 75 per cent and th e makers of "spot " welding machines—that This little book is a glossary of metallurgical get 50 per cent. th e savings of spot welding compared with term s for the operator in the machine shop and riveting are seriously affected by the cost of Considerable space is devoted to considera­ others interested . The definitions are couched th e spot welding machine, and can only be tions which should guide the engineer in in simple, as far as possible non-technical, realised on high production. designing for welding, and a numbe r of examples language. It seems admirably to fulfil the are given showing the distortion and internal No book of this kind would be complete purpose for which it is intended and should stresses which may be set up by unskilled withou t a chapter on "testing'" and this prove very useful. location of welds i n th e design stage. One feels section is well u p to th e general standard of the justified in repeating for the benefit of aero­ work. Britis h Standard Engineering Drawing plane designers in general the following sen­ The author's attempts to test by means of Office Practice. (British Standards Insti­ tence: — th e American acoustic method were unsuccess­ tution . 2s.) ful—experience in this country has proved " At the beginning of the design of the This pamphlet embodies the recommenda­ construction the designer must pay attention to similar—and after examining other suggested tions of a strong committee of the British making the weld accessible. It must be so and projected methods of testing welds without Standard s Institution made after careful con­ situated that the frame or work can penetrate destruction (including the magnetic, electrical sideration of the advice and remarks of many into the groove, and furthermore that the and hardness tests) he infers that the X-ray firms and associations consulted. Hard and Radiatio n process offers the best solution. welder can work in the most comfortable fast rules are not laid down, bu t the publication position possible since only thus is it possible to The notes on tensile testing of welded joints is obviously a step in the right direction. carry out careful work." merits the attention of test-house inspectors, The extremely well arranged diagrams, show­ and attention is drawn to the pitfalls which Britis h Standard Nomenclature. Defini­ atten d the tensile testing of welded joints on ing the types of welds approved and symbolised tion s and Symbols for Welding and account of the "Zonal " character of all welds. by the Welding Committee of the Association Gutting . (British Standard s Institution . 2s.) of German Engineers, are recommended to the The autho r suggests tha t the determination of attention of drawing office heads—the draughts­ elongation of weld-metal during tensile tests An authoritative glossary of welding and man designer is too frequently content to must be a laboratory process if the conclusions cuttin g terms which is in effect a guide to the indicate "welding" without specifying the ar e to be of value. subject. It is very fully illustrated. particular kind of welding he requires. A useful bend test apparatus for workshop Equall y useful are the shop hints given to and view-room use is described and illustrated A n Introduction to Aerodynamics. By on page 250, and this tool might well be assist in avoidance of buckling and distortion R.Poole . (Draughtsman Publishing Co. 2s.) standardized for routine tests on welding. by careful consideration of th e tacking clearance One of a scries of pamphlets published for the and jigging arrangements, and the remarks on Methods of microscopical analysis of welds are Association of Engineering and Shipbuilding the necessity for a measure of pre-heating for fully described and the value of this section is Draughtsmen, giving an elementary outline of all heavily stressed welded joints might well be enhanced by the excellent photographic air flow. studied by too zealous rate fixers. enlargements. The aeroplane designer will be particularly The welding of aluminium and its alloys interested in the concluding paragraphs of this receives only passing notice, and one is unable chapte r which deals with the comparison of to agree with the author's statement that fatigue test on equivalent welded and riveted alloys such as duralumin can be satisfactorily welded. Contrary to the views expressed in structures . The results would appear to in­ the book, the general experience in thi s country dicate that the welded structure possesses far is that aluminium alloys with an ultimate greater resistance to fatigue conditions tha n the strength of over 16 tons per square inch give equivalent riveted structure, and although extremely unsatisfactory welds, and that the this may not find favour with those designers

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 1933

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